Tag Archives: eggs

Deviled Eggs — Green Tomato, Smoked Salmon, Bacon et. al.

These are topped with leftover pulled pork & pickled green tomatoes.

These are topped with leftover pulled pork & pickled green tomatoes.

As a Southern woman of a certain age, it’s assumed that you can do a few things well. You can write a proper thank you note. You can drink good bourbon straight. And you can make a solid deviled egg.

I recently found out that one of my most quintessentially Southern lady friends doesn’t know how to do #3, so we remedied that last night.

The great thing about deviled eggs is you can make any flavor as long as you have a tasty base to start with. Mayo helps with that, but mustard goes a long way, as does pickle juice, the secret to All Good Things. Also important: axe the sweet relish most people use. That tip isn’t grandma-sanctioned, but it will give you a better “blank” slate to start with.

18 organic eggs
3 tbsp Duke’s mayonnaise
2 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 tbsp yellow mustard
1 tbsp pickle juice
1 tsp black pepper
salt to taste
paprika or cayenne

  1. Boil, cool and peel your eggs. (If you haven’t tried the hot-start method, see below. They’ll peel much easier.)
  2. Slice them in half and put all the yolks in one bowl. (And you don’t have to slice them vertically; Husk does them horizontally, and they are the devil masters.)
  3. Mash the eggs with a fork and add the remaining ingredients. Mix well. Taste and season.
  4. Separate yolk mix into 4 bowls (see below).
  5. For each ingredient, dice a 1/2 cup of your topping of choice and stir it into one bowl.
  6. Fill a Ziploc bag with the mix and cut a corner off. Pipe some filling into each egg.
  7. Top each egg with a 1-inch piece of the ingredient used in the filling. Chill until face-stuffing time.
The smoked trout variety at Husk. Can I get a swoon from all my fellow fatgirls.

The smoked trout variety at Husk. Can I get a swoon from all my fellow fatgirls.

Toppings:

With 18 eggs, you can make a bunch of kinds, but 4 different toppings works well for 18 eggs. Choose from any of the below, or use whatever you’ve got in the fridge — as long as the ingredient isn’t too sweet, anything is good stuff in an egg.

Witness:

  • Smoked salmon or trout
  • Pickled anything – green tomatoes, cucumbers, okra, etc.
  • Bacon
  • Ham (country or regular, shaved)
  • Prosciutto
  • Pulled pork
  • Olives
  • Raw tuna (topped with a dollop of wasabi)
  • Pimento cheese (what up, Marge)
  • Truffle oil

Hot-start boiling:

The fresher the egg, the harder it will be to peel when hard-boiled. This method makes them easier to de-shell without totally destroying them.

  1. Lower your eggs straight from the fridge into already-boiling water.
  2. Lower the heat to the barest simmer.
  3. Cook the eggs for 11 minutes.
  4. Shock them in ice water and let them chill for 15 minutes.
  5. Peel under cool running water.

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Filed under Appetizers, Comfort food, Party food, Side dishes, Snacks, Southern food

Akin Family Oyster Dressing ~ Groundhog’s Day 2K12

So despite my moral dilemma of yesterday, I’ve decided to go ahead and pull this one out of The Vault. (As it turns out, my threshold for withholding secret recipes is quite shallow, which is probably to be expected from a person who has a blog about recipes on the Interwebs.)

foodnetworkasia.com

Anyway, perhaps the groundhog will take a page from my book – you know, bringing things to light and such – and ignore his stupid shadow so we can get on with Real Spring instead of this faux Fall we’ve been having.

Annnnnd, rambling is now over. As I mentioned previously, this recipe has been a long time coming. My cousin Melissia had to watch my Aunt Sylvia make it three times to come up with the recipe because it had never even been written down. So it’s old school traditional is what I’m saying.

I’m also saying it is delectable, so even if you have to tinker with it a little bit to get it right, your efforts will be rewarded.

1 pan cornbread
4-6 biscuits
3-4 celery stalks, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2-3 raw eggs
2-3 boiled eggs, chopped
2 cans chicken broth
1 can oysters
1 tsp+ poultry seasoning
1 tsp+ sage
salt & pepper to taste

  1. Preheat oven to 350.
  2. Cook celery and onion in broth until tender.
  3. Crumble breads and mix all ingredients together. Taste and season accordingly. (This is where the extra sage or poultry seasoning comes in.)
  4. Pour into 9×13 pan.
  5. Bake for at least 40 minutes (longer if all of the excess moisture hasn’t evaporated).

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Filed under Christmas, Comfort food, Seafood, Side dishes, Special Occasion, Thanksgiving

Honeycomb Breakfast Casserole

closetcooking.com (pic has asparagus, recipe doesn't)

While we are nothing if not traditional around the holidays, this was one of my favorite new recipes from Akin Holidays 2K11. It was, as per usual, from my favorite old cookbook, Heart & Soul.

While I generally jump at the chance to make a new variation of Dot’s Breakfast Casserole, I saw this and knew that this sausage/mushroom/HOLLANDAISE concoction was clearly meant for me. And as with our standby breakfast casserole, it is stupid easy to make and just plain satisfying.

The interesting thing here is that it’s mushrooms (instead of the usual bread) that provide much-needed texture to the eggy goodness here. Also, while this is pretty much the same recipe you’ll find in H&S, I have taken some liberties (because what’s not better with Worcestershire?) and shortcuts (because water baths are for babies, not food), so it won’t match up exactly if you get to fact-checking.

1 lb hot sausage
8 oz portabella mushrooms
8 oz button mushrooms
dash of Worcestershire sauce + Cavendar’s
2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
8-10 eggs, beaten thoroughly

  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Grease 9×13 in. baking dish and spread cheddar cheese on the bottom.
  3. Cook sausage, drain, and layer on top of cheese.
  4. In the drippings from the sausage, cook the mushrooms until just tender, adding Worcestershire and seasoning as needed.
  5. Add into dish on top of sausage and pour egg mixture over the top.
  6. Bake for 45 minutes or until the liquid (egg) in the middle of the casserole is firm.
  7. Serve and top individual portions with Hollandaise. Nom nom nom.

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Filed under Breakfast, Christmas, Comfort food, Pork

Seriously Easy Hollandaise Sauce

simplyrecipes.com

When I told Dot that The Chef and I would be making Hollandaise for (the third) “Christmas morning” (in a row), she did not look convinced. And I’ll admit, I had some reservations.

Any time a cookbook directs me to a double-boiler, I have flashbacks of making those damn cake balls that everyone loves that are 100% NOT worth it. Trying to squish cake and icing into balls so you can dip them in rapidly hardening “melted” chocolate does not bring holiday joy; it brings profanity.

Anyway, The Chef directed me through the cheater technique for sauces (i.e. the blender), and I have no idea why anyone would go old school ever again. The consistency came out perfect, and the lemon juice provided just the right amount of acidity to cut through all the glorious buttah.

2 egg yolks
1 tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter (1 stick), melted

  1. flavoreddelights.com

    Add egg yolks to blender with salt and lemon juice. Blend.

  2. Blend on low, slowly adding melted butter. Sloooooowly. That’s the key.
  3. Serve immediately. Or if you have to wait a few minutes, keep in a warm – but not hot – spot in your kitchen until you’re ready.

I’d bet you can put this on top of anything from ham to cardboard, but we used it on the Honeycomb Breakfast Casserole, and I can verify that goodness first-hand.

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Filed under Breakfast, Christmas, Sauces, Special Occasion

Peg’s Jalapeno Cornbread

dorkbyte.com

This cornbread is the counterpart of yesterday’s veggie soup. Since The Chef and I have spent all day trying to decide which variety of soup/gumbo/stew we will be making for New Year’s Day, this was a no-brainer side dish.

Jalapeno cornbread is a great for soups because it will work for sopping but also has enough of a spicy kick to cut through the dense corn-bready-ness (word. total word.).
——-
Peg says the cornmeal in this recipe must be Aunt Jemima Buttermilk and not Martha Stewart. (Which is why I linked that Jemima example to Wal-Mart instead of K-Mart. Your lucrative deal with a giant discount store holds no water with us, Martha!)
—–
Claire also reminds us that you have to heat up the tins before adding the batter so the bottoms of the muffins are crunchified. Word to you. And your mother.
——–
2 cups cornmeal
1 1/4 cup buttermilk
3 tbsp veggie oil
2 eggs
3/4 cup sharp cheddar cheese
1 can creamed corn
chopped jalapenos (as many as you want)
———–
  1. Preheat oven to 425.
  2. Mix together all ingredients. The batter should be easy to stir and smooth but not runny. If it’s too thick, add more buttermilk.
  3. Take muffin pan and put 1/2 cap of veggie oil in each tin. Put in the oven at 425 until smokey. (This is the non-negotiable step that makes the bread crunchy all the way around.)
  4. Take out, add mix and cook at 425 for approx. 45 min.

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Filed under Bread, Comfort food, Side dishes

Classic Egg Nog ~ Christmas 2K11

We’re officially halfway through December, and we’d be remiss not to deliver some Nog directives right about now.

Some people wait until Christmas to serve up the quality stuff, but I say boo to that. On Christmas, you’re already off work, all the presents have been bought, and you’re pretty much required to eat yourself sick. Why do you need another special treat then?

No, I say we start the nogging now. Because now is the time Christmas is most likely making you her whipping boy with the travel planning, present buying and general insanity of the masses. Sidebar: Have you been to the kids’ toy section at Target lately? Yesterday I got simultaneously boxed out by a redneck looking for LEGOs and almost got run over by a lady in a Hoverround. Merry Freaking Christmas, shoppers!

Anywho, this recipe is from Joy of Cooking, the most classic of all classic cookbooks. It’s simple and delicious. And no, it will not give you salmonella so stop being such a pansy and drink up.

12 eggs (separated)
1 lb confectioner’s sugar
4-8 cups dark rum, brandy, bourbon or rye*
2 quarts whipping cream

  1. Separate eggs and beat yolks until light in color.
  2. Gradually beat in confectioner’s sugar.
  3. Add very slowly 2 cups rum (or other liquor).
  4. Let stand one hour to dispel the “eggy” taste and destroy possibility of salmonella.
  5. Add, beating constantly, 2-4 cups more of liquor and 2 qts whipping cream.
  6. Refrigerate 3 hours.
  7. Beat 8-12 egg whites until stiff but not dry and fold into mixture.
  8. Serve sprinkled with freshly grated nutmeg.

*The Chef suggests half rum/half brandy. 2 boozes=twice the fun!

**12/20/2011 Update: I actually went to the trouble to make this last week, and it got rave – I mean RAVE – reviews. I used all three liquors, and I think that was well worth its minimal trouble. Make twice as much as you think you need.

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Filed under Beverages, Party food, Special Occasion

Crawfish Cornbread Stuffing

So I probably should have posted these recipes last week before Thanksgiving, but I forgot and I wanted to test them out twice to get all kinks out of the way.  I was lucky to have two Thanksgivings this year, a “friendsgiving” down in NOLA (which was way better then my family Thanksgiving) and family Thanksgiving.  I still never want to eat again.   Below is an amazing crawfish stuffing that Chef John’s family has requested a double batch of for next year.  Perhaps you can save in your Thanksgiving recipe file for next year or break it out for the December holidays!  Chef’s note: make sure to use dry corn bread so it soaks up all the sauce. – ts

Chef John Says: Everyone knows that the best part of Thanksgiving is the stuffing. I usually dedicate about 3/4 of my plate to it. My family always has a traditional stuffing/dressing but this past Sunday we had a pre-Thanksgiving feast at our friend’s house in New Orleans and it was decided that we should make a more NOLA-style dressing. Tanya came across this beauty: Besh’s Crawfish Corn Bread Dressing. Like ALL of Besh’s recipes, this is very easy and delicious.
You can make the corn bread ahead or use leftover corn bread. In fact, the dressing may be prepared a day ahead and kept in the refrigerator until an hour before serving. I used more andouille, hot sausage, and garlic than it calls for… obviously. This recipe makes 8–10 cups, more than enough to stuff a turkey, but at our Thanksgiving we stuff our bird separately and serve dressings like this alongside. Serves 10

4 tablespoons rendered bacon fat (I used a couple tablespoons of butter instead)
¼ pound andouille sausage, diced
¼ pound hot pork sausage meat, removed from casing
1 medium onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, diced
½ green bell pepper, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 cups peeled crawfish tails, chopped (you can usually find a package of frozen tails)
2 green onions, chopped
1 small jalapeño pepper, chopped
1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
Leaves from 1 sprig fresh thyme
2 tablespoons Basic Creole Spices
6 cups crumbled Basic Corn Bread
2 cups Basic Chicken Stock
½ cup heavy cream
2 eggs, lightly beaten
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper

  1. Put the bacon fat, andouille, and pork sausage into a large skillet and cook over medium-high heat, breaking up the pork with the back of a wooden spoon.
  2. When the pork sausage meat has browned, add the onions, celery, bell peppers, and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the crawfish and cook for 2 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients to the bowl with the sausage and crawfish and stir together until well combined. Spoon the dressing into a large heatproof dish.
  4. At this point, the dressing may be covered and refrigerated (for up to 1 day) until you are ready to bake it. Bake the dressing in a preheated 350° oven until it is piping hot and golden brown, 15–30 minutes.

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Filed under Bread, Cajun food, Comfort food, Meat, Party food, Shellfish, Side dishes, Southern food, Special Occasion, Thanksgiving

Deviled Eggs

It is holiday season which means lots of family and friends entertaining.  It is always nice to have an easy but tasty appetizer to either serve or bring to a dinner party.  I love me some deviled eggs, and it is so simple to make.  There are tons of recipes out there and different variations (I recommend trying Martha’s Avocado Deviled Eggs).  I personally love straight forward mayo, mustard, egg style deviled eggs.  Nothing fancy in this recipe!  This one is courtesy of a good friend down in NOLA, Chef Anne.  She served these one time, and I seriously think I ate a dozen.  I made these last night, and Chef John and Claire (Mexican corn lover and daughter of the famous Peg from Peg’s Destin Shrimps) gave this recipe the the thumbs up!- ts

Chef Anne’s note:  You can boil the eggs and make the mixture a few hours in advance, store it in the frdige, and then put it all together right before people are ready to eat them.  Also, I use small eggs because they are more bite-size

1 dozen eggs
2 teaspoons dijon mustard (Zataran’s creole mustard is best)
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 Tbsp minced shallot
dashes of hot sauce (perhaps Sriracha!)
Salt and pepper
Paprika and Green Onion for garnish

  1. Hard boil the eggs.  Fill up a large saucepan half-way with water and gently add the eggs. Cover the eggs with at least an inch of water. Add a teaspoon of vinegar to the water.  Add a pinch of salt to the water. Bring the water to a boil. Cover, and remove from heat. Let sit covered for 12-15 minutes. Drain hot water from pan and run cold water over the eggs. (At this point if you crack the egg shells while the eggs are cooling, it will make it easier to peel the shells.) Let sit in the cool water a few minutes, changing the water if necessary to keep it cool.  If you kinda roll the eggs on the counter, the shells get all cracked and are a little easier to peel.
  2. Peel the eggs. Using a sharp knife, slice each egg in half, lengthwise. Gently remove the yolk halves and place in a small mixing bowl. (Egg yolks come out really easily, just kinda use a spoon and gently pop them out into the bowl).  Arrange the egg white halves on a serving platter.
  3. Using a fork, mash up the yolks and add mustard, mayonnaise, shallot, tabasco, chopped green onions (same some for on top) and salt and pepper to taste. Spoon egg yolk mixture into the egg white halves. (You can also use like a cake decorator thing, but I just kinda wing it…) Sprinkle with paprika and chopped green onions.
Optional: add chopped herbs to the mixture

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Filed under Appetizers, Comfort food, Party food, Snacks

Tarte au Citron (lemon tart)

I love RipleyPickles’ enthusiasm for this blog as well as her love for any challenge or FB call out even if it means failing a class.  We both have been slow to post due to a rough NOLA weekend.  Hopefully we will be back in action next week.  For now here is a great dessert recipe that is seriously the easiest thing to make and will impress all who eat it.   I am terrible at baking, yet for some reason refuse to quit trying to learn how to bake (very unfortunate for my tester Chef John).  One of these days I know I will get that secret touch, but for now my go to desserts are bake free.   ENJOY! –ts
This makes a thin, but very tasty and perfect lemony layer. If you want more filling, feel free to double the recipe.
David Lebovitz’s note: If you use Meyer lemons, reduce the sugar to 1/3 cup. Any filling that you don’t use can be spread on toast, fresh biscuits, or scones.

1/2 cup freshly-squeezed lemon juice
grated zest of one lemon
1/2 cup sugar
6 tablespoons butter, salted or unsalted, cut into bits
2 large eggs
2 large egg yolks
Fresh berries
One pre-baked 9-inch tart shell – As mentioned I am not a baker so feel free to use your favorite recipe or frozen

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F (180C.)
  2. In a medium-sized saucepan, heat the lemon juice, zest, sugar, and butter. Have a mesh strainer nearby.
  3. In a small bowl, beat together the eggs and the yolks.
  4. When the butter is melted, whisk some of the warm lemon mixture into the eggs, stirring constantly, to warm them. Scrape the warmed eggs back into the saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens and almost begins to bubble around the edges.
  5. Pour the lemon curd though a strainer directly into the pre-baked tart shell, scraping with a rubber spatula to press it through.
  6. Smooth the top of the tart and pop it in the oven for five minutes, just to set the curd.
  7. Remove from the oven and sprinkle fresh berries over top, stick in refrigerator or in a cool spot and let cool before slicing and serving.

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Filed under Dessert, French food, Party food, Special Occasion, Sweets

Ginger Fried Rice

Chef John and I use my wok at the least 2 times a week because well I have an unhealthy relationship with Asian food and we love my wok.  We make about a dozen varieties of fried rice, but Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s is hands down the best recipe.  It is so simple and clean yet extremely flavorful; it’s unlike any other fried rice I have had.  Like all fried-rice dishes, you must start this one with leftover rice; fresh rice is simply too moist.  Bittman suggests using white rice from Chinese takeout; not a bad call. The recipe calls for jasmine rice, almost any rice will do as long as it is a day old.  Also the original recipe calls for cooking the rice in rendered fat; I am just using peanut oil.  Unlike other one pot fried rice dishes, this one has a couple steps but is 100% worth the effort.  I highly recommend sprinkling some fried pancetta along with the ginger and garlic.  Of course Jean-George serves this by molding it into beautiful mounds and tops each with egg and garnish.   -ts
A Mark Bittman adaption of a Jean-Georges Vongerichten recipe, with a few tweaks.  Serves 2.

1/3 – 1/2 cup peanut oil
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 tablespoons minced ginger
1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white and light green parts only, rinsed and dried
1 cup day-old cooked rice, preferably jasmine, at room temperature
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons sesame oil
2 teaspoons soy sauce

  1. In a large skillet, heat peanut oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp and brown. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and salt lightly.
  2. Reduce heat under skillet to medium-low and add 2 tablespoons oil and leeks. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very tender but not browned. Season lightly with salt.
  3. Raise heat to medium and add rice. Cook, stirring well, until heated through and almost crispy. Season to taste with sesame oil and soy sauce.
  4. In a nonstick skillet, fry eggs in remaining oil, sunny-side-up, until edges are set but yolk is still runny.
  5. Divide rice among two dishes. Top each with an egg and drizzle a little more sesame oil and soy sauce. Sprinkle crisped garlic and ginger (and pancetta if using) over everything and serve.

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Filed under Asian food, Comfort food, Main Course, Party food, Rice, Side dishes