Tag Archives: ginger

Asian Mignonette

glidemagazine.com

As I mentioned in the classic cocktail post, an Asian Mignonette is an interesting and delectable variation for an oyster topping.

Having only tried it a few times at the schmanciest of restaurants, I was intrigued to see how the homemade version would stack up. Turns out: really darn well.

This particular blend has a depth of flavor that lends a whole new element to the oyster, but it still brings the tang you’re looking for with an oyster garnish. Again, if you’re working with quality oysters, I say go naked: splash of sauce and slurp.

1/2 cup of sake
2 shallots, minced
1/4 cup of minced ginger
1/2 cup of rice wine vinegar
3 teaspoons of soy sauce
3 tablespoon of chopped cilantro
3 green onions, chopped

  1. Mix all ingredients.
  2. Let sit for 30 minutes.
  3. Serve.

Leave a comment

Filed under Asian food, Sauces, Toppings

Barrett’s Baby Bok Choy

Aight, Imma be straight wichu: this has been in my backlog for months. And it’s not because I don’t think it’s good.

ieatmostlymeat.com

I actually can’t remember anything The Chef has cooked for me that wasn’t awesome… barring one incident with some enchiladas. And that was a disaster mostly because I was hopping around the kitchen on one leg with a large knife and we were too tired to be cooking anything more than frozen chicken nuggets. (And we actually forgot to turn the oven on when we tried to cook those, so that kind of indicates what level we were on that day.)

Anyway, I’ve been less than anxious to post this only because it’s not in my comfort zone, meaning it is not soup or pasta or a dip made with cream cheese.

But you know what? That’s exactly why it needs posting. This dish actually has some nutritional value and is pretty tasty when you sauce it up all Asian-like. And it’s downright different. So Free Yo Mind, y’all. The rest will follow.

6 oz baby bok choy, cleaned
2 tsp vegetable oil
2 tsp garlic. minced
1 tsp ginger, minced
2 tbsp scallions, thinly sliced
1 /2 tsp sesame oil
salt and pepper to taste

  1. Blanch and shock the bok choy.
  2. Heat the vegetable oil in a saute pan. Sweat the ginger, scallions, and garlic until tender.
  3. Add bok choy. Season with salt, pepper, and sesame oil.

Leave a comment

Filed under Asian food, Side dishes, Veggies

Tom Yum Soup & Shrimp Stock

I was cleaning up the ole WordPress today and ran across this dusty draft in my backlog. How it is possible to forget such a yummy recipe – especially one that involves not one but two types of soup – is beyond me. Let’s remedy that, shall we?

templeofthai.com

This is 2-for-1 in that it is The Chef’s recipe for both Shrimp Stock and Tom Yum Soup. Usually, if you don’t have the time or patience to make your stock, you can buy it; but the ingredient list on this sucker makes me think you should go traditional or go home.

And I’d wager that the flavor will be well worth it. Tom Yum is spicy, brothy Asian goodness, and the longer it simmers and permeates your house, the better it will be when you finally slurp it down.

Shrimp Stock:
1 tablespoon of olive oil
shells from 1 1/2 pounds of shrimp (shrimp reserved)
1 red bell pepper, chopped
stems of 1 lb shiitake shrooms
2 lemongrass stalks, rough chopped
3 inch piece of ginger, rough chopped
2 celery stalks, rough chopped
1 onion, rough chopped
2 tsp of tomato paste
1/2 cup rice wine (mirin)
enough water to cover

  1. Add oil to stock pot. Add shrimp shells and cook them until pink.
  2. Add the rice wine.
  3. Add the rest of the ingredients and enough water to cover.  Simmer for about 45 minutes. Strain.

Tom Yum Soup:
1 tbsp peanut oil
1.5 lbs shrimp
2 tsp sesame oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 inch piece of ginger, chopped*
2 lemongrass stalks, chopped*
3 Thai chilies*
1/2 red onion, sliced thin
2 celery stalks, cut on the diagonal into 1-inch slices
1 tbsp chili powder
1 tbsp Thai fish sauce
1 lb mushrooms, sliced
8 cups shrimp stock
2 cups cilantro, no stems
1 lime, cut into quarters for garnish
cilantro for garnish

  1. Heat large pot over medium heat. Add peanut oil. Then add garlic, chiles, ginger, lemongrass, onions, celery, sesame oil, and chili powder.  Saute, stirring occasionally, until the onion softens, 5 to 10 minutes.
  2. Add shrimp, mushrooms, and stock. Cook for about 15 minutes.
  3. Add fish sauce and cilantro.
  4. *Remove lemongrass, ginger, and Thai chilies.
  5. Serve with lime wedges and cilantro sprigs. Add soy sauce if you need salt.

The Chef warns that you will definitely have leftover stock, so freeze it for next time, and your Tom will be Yum in no time.

1 Comment

Filed under Asian food, Main Course, Soups

Apricot Ginger Sauce ~ Happy Halloween 2K11!

Happy Halloween Nummy Num Nums! Despite my intense exhaustion due to the weekend’s celebrations – i.e. Todd’s stupid ayse dressing up as the banker from Monopoly and leaving $1 million worth of fake money scattered all over Blair – I could not let this most high and holy of days pass without a recipe.

thelostclassics.com

I know this recipe isn’t for severed fingers or brain soup or whatever other disgusting “treat” Sandra Lee is no doubt whipping up today, but it is orange and therefore festive all on its own!

The Chef says this sauce is great sauce for grilled chicken, pork or even seared duck. It does sound pretty tangy and delicious, and were we not planning on feasting on some shockingly cheap Chanterelles The Chef procured from Costco for dinner, I’d be demanding duck for All Hallow’s Eve. (Luckily these shrooms are orangish on their own, so we shall be totally “wealthy” and seasonal with our supper either way.)

And if you’re looking to waste a little time today, here’s a little Monster Squad for your viewing pleasure. Yes, this is as scary as it gets for me. OH IT’S SPOOKY!

food.com

1 12 oz jar of apricot jelly
1/2 tsp sesame oil
1 tbsp minced ginger
1/2 tsp garlic minced
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar

  1. Place all ingredients in a saucepan and cook on low until the preserves are fully melted.
  2. Dunzo. Sauce and serve.

Leave a comment

Filed under Asian food, Fruit, Sauces, Toppings

Mashed Butternut Squash

allergyfreemenuplanners.com

I am not a big fan of squash – unless it’s zucchini,, which I will eat every which way from Sunday – but you call something butternut, and you’ve got my vote.

You’ve also got it when you add coconut milk to something; it’s like the Asian version of a good chicken broth – clean, homey and downright addictive.

This is a little rich, so if you’re looking for something a little lighter, a dash or two of cayenne might do a body good. Either way, this is a delightful substitute for played-out mashed potatoes and a great way to take advantage of that last farmer’s market run of the season.

1 butternut squash, peeled and diced
olive oil
salt and pepper
1 can of coconut milk
1 tsp of grated ginger

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Coat squash with oil and salt and pepper.
  3. Roast for 20 minutes or until tender.
  4. Place in a medium size pot. Mash up with a potato masher.
  5. Add ginger, coconut milk and salt and pepper to taste. (It should be the consistency of mashed potatoes.)

Leave a comment

Filed under Comfort food, Side dishes, Veggies

Lemongrass Ginger Rice

This is the less-creamy, more tangy version of your standard coconut rice. Lemongrass and ginger are always fun. Plus you get to infuse something here, and that makes everyone feel much more culinarily-empowered.

2 cups of vegetable stock (recipe coming soon)
2 lemongrass stalks, chopped
2-inch piece of ginger, chopped
1 cup of jasmine rice
splash of coconut milk
salt to taste

  1. Heat stock in a sauce pot. Add ginger and lemongrass.  Simmer for 15 minutes.
  2. Strain Stock. Add rice to pot with infused stock. Bring to boil.
  3. Once it comes to a boil, cover and turn off heat. Let steam for 20 minutes.
  4. Add a splash of coconut milk, stir and serve.

4 Comments

Filed under Asian food, Rice, Side dishes

Ginger Fried Rice

Chef John and I use my wok at the least 2 times a week because well I have an unhealthy relationship with Asian food and we love my wok.  We make about a dozen varieties of fried rice, but Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s is hands down the best recipe.  It is so simple and clean yet extremely flavorful; it’s unlike any other fried rice I have had.  Like all fried-rice dishes, you must start this one with leftover rice; fresh rice is simply too moist.  Bittman suggests using white rice from Chinese takeout; not a bad call. The recipe calls for jasmine rice, almost any rice will do as long as it is a day old.  Also the original recipe calls for cooking the rice in rendered fat; I am just using peanut oil.  Unlike other one pot fried rice dishes, this one has a couple steps but is 100% worth the effort.  I highly recommend sprinkling some fried pancetta along with the ginger and garlic.  Of course Jean-George serves this by molding it into beautiful mounds and tops each with egg and garnish.   -ts
A Mark Bittman adaption of a Jean-Georges Vongerichten recipe, with a few tweaks.  Serves 2.

1/3 – 1/2 cup peanut oil
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 tablespoons minced ginger
1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white and light green parts only, rinsed and dried
1 cup day-old cooked rice, preferably jasmine, at room temperature
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons sesame oil
2 teaspoons soy sauce

  1. In a large skillet, heat peanut oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp and brown. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and salt lightly.
  2. Reduce heat under skillet to medium-low and add 2 tablespoons oil and leeks. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very tender but not browned. Season lightly with salt.
  3. Raise heat to medium and add rice. Cook, stirring well, until heated through and almost crispy. Season to taste with sesame oil and soy sauce.
  4. In a nonstick skillet, fry eggs in remaining oil, sunny-side-up, until edges are set but yolk is still runny.
  5. Divide rice among two dishes. Top each with an egg and drizzle a little more sesame oil and soy sauce. Sprinkle crisped garlic and ginger (and pancetta if using) over everything and serve.

1 Comment

Filed under Asian food, Comfort food, Main Course, Party food, Rice, Side dishes