Tag Archives: leeks

Wild Mushroom and Leek Wild Rice Salad

I have not posted in a while, but that is because I have not been making new recipes recently.  We have so many great recipes on this site, and I had fallen into a trap of cooking the same 4 or 5 things because they are so tasty.   Yesterday I decided to browse my list of “to make” recipes and came across one that for months I kept meaning to make.  When it came down to buying the ingredients, it always just looked a little too healthy.  Since the holidays are around the corner, I thought it best to start getting the health in now.  This is a recipe for mushroom and leek wild rice I saw on Closet Cooking, with my own tweaks.  It is so tasty and surprisingly filling.  It reminds me of a healthier version of my mushroom and leek risotto recipe!  I highly recommend making this.  I served the rice over a bed of baby greens and added a couple slices of skirt steak for extra protein (quickly marinated in a soy, garlic, onion, sugar mixture and grilled).  
Wild rice takes longer to cook then regular rice so start it first!  The mushroom, leek, herb, rice mixture is tossed with balsamic vinaigrette.  Feel free to use your favorite recipe, I wrote down a standard one below.– ts

1 cup wild rice
2 cups chicken broth
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon oil
2 – 3 leeks green and white parts cleaned and sliced
2 cloves garlic
8- 10 ounces mushrooms (sliced) – I used a mix of cremini, shiitake and oyster
1 teaspoon thyme (chopped)
salt and pepper to taste
a large handful chopped pecans
about a 1/4 cup balsamic vinaigrette (recipe below)

  1. Simmer the wild rice in the broth on medium-low heat, covered, until it is tender and it has absorbed all of the broth, about 50-60 minutes and remove from heat.  Drain excess liquids.
  2. Heat the oil and melt the butter in a large dutch oven/pan.
  3. Add the leeks and saute until tender, about 10 minutes.
  4. Add the garlic and saute until fragrant, about a minute.
  5. Add the mushrooms, thyme, salt and pepper and saute until the mushrooms are just starting to caramelize, about 10-15 minutes.
  6. Mix the wild rice, mushrooms, pecans and balsamic vinaigrette
Balsamic Vinaigrette
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon honey
1-2 large cloves garlic minced
chopped herbs (optional)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1. Mix/shake everything together
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Filed under Main Course, Rice, Salad dressings, Side dishes, Veggies

Ina Garten’s Wild Mushroom Soup

This recipe is Ina Garten‘s, that sweet wonderful lady who spends her time having cocktail hour in The Hamptons with the gays and putting cream in everything.

Anyway, The Chef suggested I post this earlier today when the world was dark and gray and dreary, but lately Memphis weather has decided to be a rancid, sobbing manic depressive mess, so now it’s freaking beautiful outside. Whatever. We are not to be deterred. Soup was suggested, and soup you shall have.

And if you’re gonna have one, this should be it. This is perfection even if you don’t have a borderline shameful obsession with mushroom. (I literally just googled “disorder: people who marry vegetables” because I thought there might be a hilariously awesome word for crazyfolk who try to do stuff like this somewhere, but alas, I must be the first.) My problems aside, this is creamy, comforting goodness, so go get your Ina on, girl.

5 oz shiitake mushrooms
5 oz portobello mushrooms
5 oz cremini (or porcini) mushrooms
1 tbsp olive oil
1/4 pound + 1 tbsp unsalted butter
1 cup yellow onion, chopped
1 carrot, chopped
1 sprig fresh thyme + 1 tsp minced thyme, divided
salt & pepper
2 cups leeks, white and light green parts chopped (2 leeks)
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup dry white wine
1 cup half-and-half
1 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, minced

  1. Clean the mushrooms. Separate the stems, trim off any bad parts, and coarsely chop the stems. Slice the mushroom caps 1/4-inch thick and or cut them into bite-sized pieces. Set aside.
  2. Make the stock:
    1. Heat olive oil and 1 tablespoon of the butter in a large pot. Add the chopped mushroom stems, onion, carrot, sprig of thyme, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper and cook over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes or until the vegetables are soft.
    2. Add 6 cups water, bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes.
    3. Strain, reserving the liquid. (You should have about 4.5 cups of stock. If not, add some water.)
  3. Meanwhile, in another large pot, heat the remaining 1/4 pound of butter and add the leeks. Cook over low heat for 15 to 20 minutes, until the leeks begin to brown.
  4. Add the sliced mushroom caps and cook for 10 minutes or until they are browned and tender.
  5. Add the flour and cook for 1 minute. Add the white wine and stir for another minute, scraping the bottom of the pot.
  6. Add the mushroom stock, minced thyme leaves, 1.5 tsp salt, and 1 tsp pepper and bring to a boil.
  7. Reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  8. Add the half-and-half, cream, and parsley. Season with salt and pepper to taste and heat through (do not boil).

Serve hot.

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Filed under Appetizers, Comfort food, Soups, Veggies

Ginger Fried Rice

Chef John and I use my wok at the least 2 times a week because well I have an unhealthy relationship with Asian food and we love my wok.  We make about a dozen varieties of fried rice, but Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s is hands down the best recipe.  It is so simple and clean yet extremely flavorful; it’s unlike any other fried rice I have had.  Like all fried-rice dishes, you must start this one with leftover rice; fresh rice is simply too moist.  Bittman suggests using white rice from Chinese takeout; not a bad call. The recipe calls for jasmine rice, almost any rice will do as long as it is a day old.  Also the original recipe calls for cooking the rice in rendered fat; I am just using peanut oil.  Unlike other one pot fried rice dishes, this one has a couple steps but is 100% worth the effort.  I highly recommend sprinkling some fried pancetta along with the ginger and garlic.  Of course Jean-George serves this by molding it into beautiful mounds and tops each with egg and garnish.   -ts
A Mark Bittman adaption of a Jean-Georges Vongerichten recipe, with a few tweaks.  Serves 2.

1/3 – 1/2 cup peanut oil
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 tablespoons minced ginger
1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white and light green parts only, rinsed and dried
1 cup day-old cooked rice, preferably jasmine, at room temperature
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons sesame oil
2 teaspoons soy sauce

  1. In a large skillet, heat peanut oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp and brown. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and salt lightly.
  2. Reduce heat under skillet to medium-low and add 2 tablespoons oil and leeks. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very tender but not browned. Season lightly with salt.
  3. Raise heat to medium and add rice. Cook, stirring well, until heated through and almost crispy. Season to taste with sesame oil and soy sauce.
  4. In a nonstick skillet, fry eggs in remaining oil, sunny-side-up, until edges are set but yolk is still runny.
  5. Divide rice among two dishes. Top each with an egg and drizzle a little more sesame oil and soy sauce. Sprinkle crisped garlic and ginger (and pancetta if using) over everything and serve.

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Filed under Asian food, Comfort food, Main Course, Party food, Rice, Side dishes

Citrus Steamed Mussels

Alright, alright we know – this is the fifth mussel recipe we have posted. The Chef thinks this is a problem but I, as a person who used to buy the same pair of shoes in 3 different colors, thinks it’s just dandy. Good is good no matter how many different ways you use the same ingredient, and the Brantley-Grosshans crew said these were not just good but awesome.

Contrary to our usual M.O., this recipe has no cream and is pretty light stuff, so let it never be said we don’t give you idiots who want to be healthy some choices.

5 lbs of mussels
2 shallots, minced
4 leeks, diced small
1/2 bottle of white wine
5 garlic cloves, sliced
3 oranges, (2 zested, 1 sliced)
3 lemons (2 zested, 1 sliced)
3 limes (2 zested, 1 sliced)
1 tablespoon of oil
few sprigs of thyme
3 tablespoons of butter

  1. Heat a big pot on medium high heat and add oil.  Add leeks, shallots, and garlic. Cook until caramelized and then add thyme.
  2. Add mussels and citrus slices. Add wine, turn heat to high and cover.
  3. Once mussels are all open, remove with slotted spoon and cover with foil.
  4. Remove citrus slices. Add butter to sauce, zest and citrus juice.  Serve up. Crusty bread of course.

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Filed under Fruit, Main Course, Sauces, Seafood

Potato Leek Gratin

This recipe works well as a side dish to anything and is great to serve at parties.   I was craving Potato Leek soup one cold NYC night (not the norm craving for me), and I was too lazy to bring out the blender.  I decided to take the ingredients and make a casserole!  It turned out well, and I have been using this recipe every since.  -ts

3-4 large leeks cleaned and chopped
5-7 small yukon gold potatoes
cream (or milk)
three tablespoons butter
1/2 cup water or broth
1 small minced garlic clove
juice of less then half a lemon
salt/pepper

  1. Preheat oven 400 degrees.  Melt butter in pan, add chopped leeks with garlic, salt and pepper to season on medium heat; Cook about 5-10 mins (until butter is absorbed)
  2. Add broth (water) bring to boil and cook until almost gone; add cream (not too much), cook for about 20 mins on lower heat. 
  3. While leeks are cooking, boil salted water and cook potatoes until almost tender, about 10 mins.  Allow to cool and slice thin.  
  4. When leeks are almost done, add lemon juice.  If mixture is still dry add more cream and perhaps a little more water if you don’t like super creamy but need more liquid.  After everything is finished, in a well buttered baking dish add half leek mixture in the pan, add layers of sliced potatoes salt pepper grated cheese, and then again leek mixture, pots, salt pepper cheese.
  5. Cook in oven for about 25-30 mins.   

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Filed under Comfort food, Party food, Potatoes, Side dishes, Veggies

Mushroom Risotto

After many trials at different risotto methods and recipes, I have finally found the one.  This is based off of my favorite leading lady in the kitchen (other then Julia) Lidia Bastianich’s Basic Risotto recipe.  This recipe is so good.  I use the leftovers and make Risotto balls, creamy and cheesy meets deep-fried, yes please!  You just dredge them in a batter and fry.  I add more cheese in the middle of the balls.  – ts

1 package hot chicken stock (preferably homemade, it will change the whole experience of this dish)
3 tablespoon olive oil- enough to sauté onions, leeks, and mushrooms (add more during cooking process if needed)
1 medium yellow onion minced
1 medium leek, white parts only, trimmed, cleaned and chopped
4 to 6 scallions, trimmed, white and green parts chopped separately
12 ounce mixed mushrooms
2 cup Arborio rice
1/3 cup dry white wine or red wine (good wine please)
Salt
zest and juice of 1 lemon
handful of herbs (thyme or rosemary will work)
2 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into 4 pieces
freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
Freshly ground black pepper

  1. Pour the stock into a 2-quart saucepan and keep it hot over low heat.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large pot (dutch oven) medium heat. Stir in the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 4 minutes. Stir in the leek and the white parts of the scallions and cook, stirring, until the onion is golden, about 6 minutes. Adjust the heat under the pan as the onion browns so that it cooks slowly with gentle bubbling.
  3. Add the mushrooms along with salt and pepper for seasonings, add herbs, lemon zest and juice of half a lemon.  Let sauté for about 7 mins.
  4. Stir in the rice and continue stirring until the grains are coated with oil and toasted (the edges will become translucent), 1 to 2 minute.  Toasting your rice is very important so don’t skip out on this step!  
  5. Pour in the wine and let it boil, stirring the rice, until evaporated.
  6.  Season the rice lightly with salt and ladle enough of the hot stock into the pan to barely cover the rice. Bring to a boil, lower the heat so the stock is at a lively simmer. Cook, stirring constantly, until all the stock has been absorbed and you can see the bottom of the pan when you stir.
  7. Continue cooking, pouring in the remaining hot stock in small batches–each addition should be just enough to completely moisten the rice–and cook until each batch of stock has been absorbed. Stir constantly until the rice mixture is creamy but al dente. This will take anywhere from 15-30 minutes from the time the wine was added. Make sure to taste the rice during the process to test for doneness.  When in doubt, undercook–risotto continues to cook, even after it is removed from the heat. 
  8. Towards end of cooking process, taste for additional seasons of salt and lemon juice.  I like everything lemony so I add the rest of the lemon juice.
  9. Remove the pan from the heat; stir in the butter and green parts of the scallion until the butter is completely melted. Stir in half the grated cheese. Taste the risotto and add salt, if necessary, and pepper. Top with freshly grated cheese.

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Filed under Comfort food, Italian food, Main Course, Rice