Tag Archives: soy sauce

Michelada ~ Cinco de Mayo 2K12

Yeah, so it’s pretty clear from the title of this post that I’m about a month late in getting around to it…

Garden & Gun

But it’s never too late for a beer-based beverage! Especially one that acts as a welcome substitute for a Bloody Mary when the summer is too sticky for tomato juice but you still need something to knock last night’s fog out.

The basic version of this drink is just lime juice and beer, but The Chef pointed me toward a Garden & Gun recipe that uses soy and Worcestershire, and my salt addiction rejoiced. (If you are not a sodium addict, you can control the amount by limiting the sauce additions.)

So if you like to drink anything bloody (Mary or Beer – this is not a vampire reference), try this out on Memorial Day. It’s an icy, refreshing change of pace. Ole!

1 beer (Mexican preferably, but anything without too strong a flavor will do)
2 limes, juiced
hot sauce
dash of soy sauce
dash of Worcestershire
dash of spices (like Tony’s)
Kosher salt

  1. Run a lime wedge around your glass and rim with salt.
  2. Fill halfway with ice.
  3. Add all ingredients, saving beer for last.
  4. Stir and slurrrrrrrp. Salty goodness.

Leave a comment

Filed under Alcohol, Beverages, Mexican food

Asian Mignonette

glidemagazine.com

As I mentioned in the classic cocktail post, an Asian Mignonette is an interesting and delectable variation for an oyster topping.

Having only tried it a few times at the schmanciest of restaurants, I was intrigued to see how the homemade version would stack up. Turns out: really darn well.

This particular blend has a depth of flavor that lends a whole new element to the oyster, but it still brings the tang you’re looking for with an oyster garnish. Again, if you’re working with quality oysters, I say go naked: splash of sauce and slurp.

1/2 cup of sake
2 shallots, minced
1/4 cup of minced ginger
1/2 cup of rice wine vinegar
3 teaspoons of soy sauce
3 tablespoon of chopped cilantro
3 green onions, chopped

  1. Mix all ingredients.
  2. Let sit for 30 minutes.
  3. Serve.

Leave a comment

Filed under Asian food, Sauces, Toppings

Pork Tenderloin a la Grosshans

bigflavors.blogspot.com

This recipe comes to us from the grill of the Grosshans. You may know them from such hits as JR’s Brandy Mustard Filets and Bonnie’s Artichoke Dip. And if you know those, you know this recipe is pretty much a guaranteed “W.”

These are undoubtedly amazing when cooked on the Big Green Egg, but the marinade itself will dress up your tenderloin even if you don’t have the daddy of all grills at your disposal.

Obviously we would pimp any of our Nummy sauces for this, but I’d wager that reducing the leftover marinade would make a pretty delicious topper all on its own. (But boil it before you reduce it, y’all. We don’t need anyone dropping dead of raw-pork-related illness on our watch.)

2 pork tenderloins
1 cup olive oil
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup soy sauce
4 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tbsp dry mustard
juice of 1 lemon
5 garlic gloves, smashed
2 tbsp of coarse black pepper

  1. Mix all ingredients together and marinate pork in them for at least 3 hours.
  2. Grill to your preference. Serve on rolls with Horseradish Cream Sauce.

Leave a comment

Filed under Main Course, Meat, Pork

Lemon Sesame Vinaigrette

It’s Monday, and due to the fact that I spent the better part of my Sunday sitting in traffic on I-40, all I want to do today is watch Netflix and play on Facebook as I normally would on Sunday. Unfortunately I have this stupid job thingy that’s totally ruining my plans.

So I’m giving my brain a break and posting something simple and fresh that I wish I’d had for lunch instead of the cold chicken fingers I actually ate. The Chef served this vinaigrette over roasted shrooms and carrots, and I must say between this and the baby carrot recipe, he’s actively proving that they aren’t just lame ranch-covered OM-related snacks from my childhood.

1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup soy sauce
3/4 cup canola oil
1/4 sesame oil
1 bunch of scallions, thinly sliced
1/2 cup of toasted sesame seeds

  1. Whisk together.
  2. Dress your veggies.
  3. Intake.

The Chef says this also works well as a marinade for lamb or beef. I cannot, however, vouch for lamb yet as that is one of the foods he has yet to make for me in an attempt to prove that it doesn’t, in fact, taste like dirt and barnyard like I think it does. I’ll keep you posted on that one.

Leave a comment

Filed under Marinades, Salad, Salad dressings, Sauces

Caribbean Jerk Rub (Wet)

This recipe uses a scotch bonnet, and, if you think about the name of that pepper literally (i.e. a small older Scottish woman dressed like Miss Muffet), I think we can all agree it’s cute as crap. Also, reading the list of spices literally made my mouth water, so it’s probably good as crap too.

1/2 medium yellow onion, chopped
3 scallions, chopped
1 scotch bonnet, cut in half
2 tbsp chopped thyme
2 tsp ground allspice
11/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 ground cloves
1/2 tsp grated nutmeg
1/4 cup  dark rum
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup vegetable oil

  1. Combine all ingredients in a blender and puree into a smooth, thick paste.
  2. Use on pork, chicken, or seafood. It will last for about 3 days. (The rub, that is, not the food. If your food lasts for 3 days you are my grandmother and need to eat more quickly.)

Leave a comment

Filed under Marinades, Rubs, Sauces

Ginger Fried Rice

Chef John and I use my wok at the least 2 times a week because well I have an unhealthy relationship with Asian food and we love my wok.  We make about a dozen varieties of fried rice, but Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s is hands down the best recipe.  It is so simple and clean yet extremely flavorful; it’s unlike any other fried rice I have had.  Like all fried-rice dishes, you must start this one with leftover rice; fresh rice is simply too moist.  Bittman suggests using white rice from Chinese takeout; not a bad call. The recipe calls for jasmine rice, almost any rice will do as long as it is a day old.  Also the original recipe calls for cooking the rice in rendered fat; I am just using peanut oil.  Unlike other one pot fried rice dishes, this one has a couple steps but is 100% worth the effort.  I highly recommend sprinkling some fried pancetta along with the ginger and garlic.  Of course Jean-George serves this by molding it into beautiful mounds and tops each with egg and garnish.   -ts
A Mark Bittman adaption of a Jean-Georges Vongerichten recipe, with a few tweaks.  Serves 2.

1/3 – 1/2 cup peanut oil
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 tablespoons minced ginger
1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white and light green parts only, rinsed and dried
1 cup day-old cooked rice, preferably jasmine, at room temperature
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons sesame oil
2 teaspoons soy sauce

  1. In a large skillet, heat peanut oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp and brown. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and salt lightly.
  2. Reduce heat under skillet to medium-low and add 2 tablespoons oil and leeks. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very tender but not browned. Season lightly with salt.
  3. Raise heat to medium and add rice. Cook, stirring well, until heated through and almost crispy. Season to taste with sesame oil and soy sauce.
  4. In a nonstick skillet, fry eggs in remaining oil, sunny-side-up, until edges are set but yolk is still runny.
  5. Divide rice among two dishes. Top each with an egg and drizzle a little more sesame oil and soy sauce. Sprinkle crisped garlic and ginger (and pancetta if using) over everything and serve.

1 Comment

Filed under Asian food, Comfort food, Main Course, Party food, Rice, Side dishes

Sticky Lemon Chicken

In keeping with the questionable titles of our recipes this week, (“Lava poop,” Nads? If that doesn’t whet your appetite, I guess nothing will.) we present you with a sticky sauce that is well worth the extra napkins.

I have not had the pleasure of trying this yet, but I’m a big fan of dark meat and cooking chicken on the bone because they both make the meat more flavorful. And the mixture of vinegar, soy sauce, honey and garlic sounds like a great riff on Asian food without requiring you to go full-Pet Store.

4-5 chicken thighs
sea salt and black pepper
3-4 tbsp olive oil
2 cloves of garlic, halved
thyme, a few sprigs
sherry or red wine vinegar, splash
2 tbsp dark soy sauce
3 tbsp honey
1 lemon, finely sliced
splash of water or stock

  1. Season chicken with salt and pepper.  Heat a saute pan to high heat. Add oil and brown chicken in skillet. Once browned, remove to plate.
  2. Add garlic and cook for 2 mintues over medium high heat.
  3. Add vinegar and cook down until reduced by half.
  4. Add soy sauce, honey, thyme, and water. Return chicken to pan, turning to coat with sauce.  Add lemon slices, Cook until the sauce is syrupy, about 10 minutes.
  5. Once  chicken is fully cooked, pull it out of the pan, plate and drizzle with sauce.

Serve up with some roasted red potatoes or Bacon Potato salad and some wet wipes. Because I’m sure this is much more fun if you eat it with your hands. Medieval Times anyone? Holla at the White Knight!

2 Comments

Filed under Chicken, Main Course, Sauces