Category Archives: Meat

Crawfish Cornbread Stuffing

So I probably should have posted these recipes last week before Thanksgiving, but I forgot and I wanted to test them out twice to get all kinks out of the way.  I was lucky to have two Thanksgivings this year, a “friendsgiving” down in NOLA (which was way better then my family Thanksgiving) and family Thanksgiving.  I still never want to eat again.   Below is an amazing crawfish stuffing that Chef John’s family has requested a double batch of for next year.  Perhaps you can save in your Thanksgiving recipe file for next year or break it out for the December holidays!  Chef’s note: make sure to use dry corn bread so it soaks up all the sauce. – ts

Chef John Says: Everyone knows that the best part of Thanksgiving is the stuffing. I usually dedicate about 3/4 of my plate to it. My family always has a traditional stuffing/dressing but this past Sunday we had a pre-Thanksgiving feast at our friend’s house in New Orleans and it was decided that we should make a more NOLA-style dressing. Tanya came across this beauty: Besh’s Crawfish Corn Bread Dressing. Like ALL of Besh’s recipes, this is very easy and delicious.
You can make the corn bread ahead or use leftover corn bread. In fact, the dressing may be prepared a day ahead and kept in the refrigerator until an hour before serving. I used more andouille, hot sausage, and garlic than it calls for… obviously. This recipe makes 8–10 cups, more than enough to stuff a turkey, but at our Thanksgiving we stuff our bird separately and serve dressings like this alongside. Serves 10

4 tablespoons rendered bacon fat (I used a couple tablespoons of butter instead)
¼ pound andouille sausage, diced
¼ pound hot pork sausage meat, removed from casing
1 medium onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, diced
½ green bell pepper, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 cups peeled crawfish tails, chopped (you can usually find a package of frozen tails)
2 green onions, chopped
1 small jalapeño pepper, chopped
1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
Leaves from 1 sprig fresh thyme
2 tablespoons Basic Creole Spices
6 cups crumbled Basic Corn Bread
2 cups Basic Chicken Stock
½ cup heavy cream
2 eggs, lightly beaten
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper

  1. Put the bacon fat, andouille, and pork sausage into a large skillet and cook over medium-high heat, breaking up the pork with the back of a wooden spoon.
  2. When the pork sausage meat has browned, add the onions, celery, bell peppers, and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the crawfish and cook for 2 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients to the bowl with the sausage and crawfish and stir together until well combined. Spoon the dressing into a large heatproof dish.
  4. At this point, the dressing may be covered and refrigerated (for up to 1 day) until you are ready to bake it. Bake the dressing in a preheated 350° oven until it is piping hot and golden brown, 15–30 minutes.
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Filed under Bread, Cajun food, Comfort food, Meat, Party food, Shellfish, Side dishes, Southern food, Special Occasion, Thanksgiving

Pork Tenderloin a la Grosshans

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This recipe comes to us from the grill of the Grosshans. You may know them from such hits as JR’s Brandy Mustard Filets and Bonnie’s Artichoke Dip. And if you know those, you know this recipe is pretty much a guaranteed “W.”

These are undoubtedly amazing when cooked on the Big Green Egg, but the marinade itself will dress up your tenderloin even if you don’t have the daddy of all grills at your disposal.

Obviously we would pimp any of our Nummy sauces for this, but I’d wager that reducing the leftover marinade would make a pretty delicious topper all on its own. (But boil it before you reduce it, y’all. We don’t need anyone dropping dead of raw-pork-related illness on our watch.)

2 pork tenderloins
1 cup olive oil
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup soy sauce
4 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 tbsp dry mustard
juice of 1 lemon
5 garlic gloves, smashed
2 tbsp of coarse black pepper

  1. Mix all ingredients together and marinate pork in them for at least 3 hours.
  2. Grill to your preference. Serve on rolls with Horseradish Cream Sauce.

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Filed under Main Course, Meat, Pork

Dunny’s Party Meatballs ~ a.k.a. “DunnyBalls”

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There’s nothing better at a party than a good meatball. And despite the fact that I have to use an entire Tide-to-go pen anytime I come near them, I will still inhale those suckers like it’s my job.

This is Dunny’s patented recipe, and it’s sure to produce a leftover-free pot. Most meatball recipes I’ve encountered involve BBQ sauce, so I like the Lexington twist of jelly and cocktail here.

You can make these in any pot on the stove, but I love a crock pot because it allows you to munch continuously and you get to use those fun little decorative toothpicks.

And no matter what you do, make sure to get the highest quality balls you can. I know Dunny always does. Heyyyyo!

2 bags frozen meatballs (around 50)
2 8 oz. jars red currant jelly
1 12 oz. jar Heinz cocktail sauce
1 box beef broth

  1. From Dunny: “Pretty much dump and stir occasionally til heated through.”
    Couldn’t have said it better myself.

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Filed under Appetizers, Meat, Party food

Red Wine Braised Short Ribs

Good news nummies – not only is it Friday, but my delusions of fall have finally become reality! It’s cool and crisp and it reminds me of my Uncle Stewart’s tailgate: Hot Damn and brown-sugar-hand-stirred-some-other-long-string-of-words-I-can’t remember BBQ sauce (recipe still pending release) will make you forget that you’re about to watch the Tigers get trounced. Again.

Anyway, another thing fall reminds me of is short ribs. Luckily, Morg passed this recipe along to me last week. And she didn’t even wait until she finished eating it to send it over, so it must be cray-mazing. (I watched a lot of Project Runway last night, so I’m talking like a cranky, mid-30s drama queen. Please forgive.)

From Morg:
“This recipe calls for a tagine (which we randomly have) but I hadn’t ‘seasoned’ the tagine (a three hour process) so I just used my dutch oven, which every chef needs. I’m obsessed with mine. I digress. This is a great meal for a Sunday or a holiday because it requires some hours on the stove, but it’s so worth it. And it leaves a nice smell floating through the house all day long. I served this over homemade mashed potatoes (recipe linked to from the Williams-Sonoma recipe for the ribs). Very simple. And I used the KitchenAid mixer instead of mashing by hand.”

One look through the ingredient list, and I was sold. I might suggest using one of The Chef’s variations of mashed potatoes, but I could be biased, so whatever blows your skirt up. Either way, an all-day simmering situation makes my mouth water. And it makes me want to say – like an Akin at a tailgate – HOT DAMN HELL YES.

3 tbsp olive oil
3 3/4 lb. bone-in beef short ribs (6 to 8 pieces)
salt & pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 celery stalk, 1/4-inch dice
2 carrots, 1/4-inch dice
3/4 cup shallot, fine dice
1 tbsp minced garlic
3 tbsp tomato paste
3/4 tsp Aleppo chili, crushed
1 bay leaf
1 tsp fresh thyme, chopped
1/2 cup beef broth
3/4 cup red wine
1 tbsp fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

  1. Soak a tagine according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Place the tagine on a diffuser over medium-high heat and warm 1 tbsp of the olive oil.
  2. Season the short ribs on all sides with salt and pepper. Dredge the ribs in the flour until evenly coated, shaking off the excess. Add half of the ribs to the tagine and sear until well browned on all sides, about 10 minutes total; transfer to a plate. Repeat with 1 tbsp of the olive oil and the remaining ribs.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium and warm the remaining 1 tbsp olive oil. Add the celery, carrots and shallot and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned, 7 to 8 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste and cook for 1 minute. Add the Aleppo chili, bay leaf, thyme, broth, wine, salt and pepper and bring to a simmer. Return the ribs to the tagine.
  4. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and cook, turning the ribs occasionally, until the meat is tender, 4.5 to 5 hours.
  5. Garnish the ribs with the parsley and serve immediately with mashed potatoes. Serves 4.

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Filed under Beef, Comfort food, Meat

Braised Osso Buco with Citrus Gremolata

I know what you’re thinking: that is one high-falutin’ recipe title right there. It sounds like something Frasier & Niles might eat and something you straight can’t afford. (I’ve neglected Frasier references for some time now, and as a Cheers cast member and spin-off star in his own right, that simply has to be remedied.)

In any case, I bought osso bucoItalian for “bone with a hole” – from the friendly Newman Farm folks at the Memphis Farmers Market, and I had absolutely no idea what it was. (I was aiming for pork belly, but the smallest portion they had was 11 pounds, and even on my fattest of days I might lose the battle against that much pork.)

The Chef later informed me that osso buco is simply a veal shank, meaning baby cow’s leg (which is obviously super sad but also pretty delicious – sorry PETA!). We braised this sucker for 3 hours, and it eventually fell right off the bone like the books say. Moo!

Osso Buco
2 lbs veal shanks
1 celery stalk, diced
1 carrot, diced
1 onion, diced
1 cup white wine
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup of beef or chicken stock
1 can of chopped tomatoes with juice
2 strips of orange zest
salt and pepper
few sprigs of fresh thyme

Citrus Gremolata
2 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 tsp garlic, minced
1 tsp grated lemon zest
1 tsp grated orange zest

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
  2. Season shanks with salt and pepper. Heat olive oil in a dutch oven over high heat. Brown shanks on all sides.
  3. Remove shanks and add veggies. Saute until well carmelized.  Then add tomatoes, stock, thyme, bay leaf, orange zest, and garlic.
  4. Place shanks back in the dutch oven and bring to a simmer. Then cover and place in oven for 3.5 hours.
  5. Once shanks are pulling away from the bone, remove and puree sauce for a thicker texture.
  6. Top with sauce then gremolata. (The Chef cautions you not to skip this step because the gremolata really brightens up this dish.)
  7. Serve with Blue Cheese Mashed Potatoes and Sauteed Squash, Zucchini & Red Pepper.

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Filed under Italian food, Main Course, Meat

Lexington Pork Shoulder ~ BBQ Fest 2K11

It’s that time again, Memphis. The time when the weather is warm but not yet a sweaty swamp, the work days seem a little bit shorter with a patio to look forward to at the end of the day, and the beer and BBQ flow freely from the banks of the Mississippi.
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Well actually, as most of you know, the Mississippi is giving the proverbial wet finger to all of us this year, so the beer and BBQ will have to flow from the banks of Central Avenue at good ole Tiger Lane. While the riverside breeze will undoubtedly be missed, Memphians know BBQ Fest is about the people, and you can always count on this crowd for a good time.
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In honor of BBQ Fest week, we at Nummy would like to bring you an offering from the kitchen of JR Grosshans. I have yet to taste this succulent selection, but The Chef assures that JR knows how to do a pig right. And I believe him. JR is too good a Southern boy to do pork wrong.
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Rub:
4 tsp sweet paprika
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp white pepper
1 tsp dry mustard
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
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Pork & ‘fixins’ (cuz that’s what we say in The South, y’all):
1 bone-in pork shoulder, 5-7 lbs
hamburger buns
4-6 wood chips or chunks (preferably hickory), soaked for 1 hour in water to cover, then drained
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  1. Make the rub: Mix all ingredients. Set aside 1.5 tbsp vinegar for the sauce.  Sprinkle the remaining rub all over the pork.
  2. Set up grill for indirect heat and preheat to medium low.  Place a large drip pan in the center and toss 1 cup of wood chips on the coals.
  3. Place the pork skin side up in the center of the hot grate over the drip pan and away from the heat and cover grill.  Add 12 fresh coals every hour and 1/2 of wood chips to each side.
  4. Cook until darkly browned on the outside and very tender inside, about 4-6 hours.  The internal temperature should reach 195 degrees.
  5. Pull off grill and cover with foil.  Let rest for at least 20 minutes.
  6. Pull pork into large pieces, discarding any bones or lumps of fat.  Transfer pork the pulled pork to a large aluminum foil pan and stir in 1 to 1.5 cups of vinegar sauce.
  7. Chow.

Eating pig is messy. If you’re not covered with sauce when you’re done, you’re not doing it right.

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Filed under Comfort food, Main Course, Meat, Pork, Rubs, Southern food

Beer Chili

In a rare wave of optimism, I actually thought it was not going to be cold enough again this spring for us to post this, but once again, Mother Nature has decided to play dirty. Luckily this recipe includes two of my most favorite things, so I’ve decided to look at this as a positive.
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I believe this is another recipe The Chef stole from JR’s private stash, and judging by the comments we’ve received on his Brandy Mustard Filets, you should probably just go ahead and make this now.
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On a related note, watch yo’self when you ignite the brandy in that filet recipe. One Covington resident (who shall remain nameless) almost burned down his house with that step. And I think we’d all agree that Covington law enforcement and emergency services probably have their hands full as it is.
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2 lbs ground beef
1 large onion, diced
1 green bell pepper, diced
1 poblano pepper, diced
2 -3 Red Stripe beers
2 packages chili seasoning
2 cans of rotel, 1 hot and 1 mild
1 30 oz can stewed tomatoes
3 bay leaves
1 can of kidney beans
1 tablespoon of sugar
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  1. In a Dutch oven, brown beef and drain.
  2. Return to heat and add onions and peppers. Cook about 15 mintues on medium heat.
  3. Add tomatoes, beer, chili seasoning, rotel, and bay leaves.
  4. Simmer for several hours.  (The longer you simmer, the better it will be.)
  5. Rinse and drain kidney beans. Add right before seving.
  6. Serve with Mexican Crema, cheddar cheese, and chopped green onions. Oh, and the rest of that Red Stripe. Just for good measure.

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Filed under Beef, Comfort food, Main Course, Meat, Soups