Tag Archives: shallot

Deviled Eggs

It is holiday season which means lots of family and friends entertaining.  It is always nice to have an easy but tasty appetizer to either serve or bring to a dinner party.  I love me some deviled eggs, and it is so simple to make.  There are tons of recipes out there and different variations (I recommend trying Martha’s Avocado Deviled Eggs).  I personally love straight forward mayo, mustard, egg style deviled eggs.  Nothing fancy in this recipe!  This one is courtesy of a good friend down in NOLA, Chef Anne.  She served these one time, and I seriously think I ate a dozen.  I made these last night, and Chef John and Claire (Mexican corn lover and daughter of the famous Peg from Peg’s Destin Shrimps) gave this recipe the the thumbs up!- ts

Chef Anne’s note:  You can boil the eggs and make the mixture a few hours in advance, store it in the frdige, and then put it all together right before people are ready to eat them.  Also, I use small eggs because they are more bite-size

1 dozen eggs
2 teaspoons dijon mustard (Zataran’s creole mustard is best)
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 Tbsp minced shallot
dashes of hot sauce (perhaps Sriracha!)
Salt and pepper
Paprika and Green Onion for garnish

  1. Hard boil the eggs.  Fill up a large saucepan half-way with water and gently add the eggs. Cover the eggs with at least an inch of water. Add a teaspoon of vinegar to the water.  Add a pinch of salt to the water. Bring the water to a boil. Cover, and remove from heat. Let sit covered for 12-15 minutes. Drain hot water from pan and run cold water over the eggs. (At this point if you crack the egg shells while the eggs are cooling, it will make it easier to peel the shells.) Let sit in the cool water a few minutes, changing the water if necessary to keep it cool.  If you kinda roll the eggs on the counter, the shells get all cracked and are a little easier to peel.
  2. Peel the eggs. Using a sharp knife, slice each egg in half, lengthwise. Gently remove the yolk halves and place in a small mixing bowl. (Egg yolks come out really easily, just kinda use a spoon and gently pop them out into the bowl).  Arrange the egg white halves on a serving platter.
  3. Using a fork, mash up the yolks and add mustard, mayonnaise, shallot, tabasco, chopped green onions (same some for on top) and salt and pepper to taste. Spoon egg yolk mixture into the egg white halves. (You can also use like a cake decorator thing, but I just kinda wing it…) Sprinkle with paprika and chopped green onions.
Optional: add chopped herbs to the mixture
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Filed under Appetizers, Comfort food, Party food, Snacks

Red Wine Braised Short Ribs

Good news nummies – not only is it Friday, but my delusions of fall have finally become reality! It’s cool and crisp and it reminds me of my Uncle Stewart’s tailgate: Hot Damn and brown-sugar-hand-stirred-some-other-long-string-of-words-I-can’t remember BBQ sauce (recipe still pending release) will make you forget that you’re about to watch the Tigers get trounced. Again.

Anyway, another thing fall reminds me of is short ribs. Luckily, Morg passed this recipe along to me last week. And she didn’t even wait until she finished eating it to send it over, so it must be cray-mazing. (I watched a lot of Project Runway last night, so I’m talking like a cranky, mid-30s drama queen. Please forgive.)

From Morg:
“This recipe calls for a tagine (which we randomly have) but I hadn’t ‘seasoned’ the tagine (a three hour process) so I just used my dutch oven, which every chef needs. I’m obsessed with mine. I digress. This is a great meal for a Sunday or a holiday because it requires some hours on the stove, but it’s so worth it. And it leaves a nice smell floating through the house all day long. I served this over homemade mashed potatoes (recipe linked to from the Williams-Sonoma recipe for the ribs). Very simple. And I used the KitchenAid mixer instead of mashing by hand.”

One look through the ingredient list, and I was sold. I might suggest using one of The Chef’s variations of mashed potatoes, but I could be biased, so whatever blows your skirt up. Either way, an all-day simmering situation makes my mouth water. And it makes me want to say – like an Akin at a tailgate – HOT DAMN HELL YES.

3 tbsp olive oil
3 3/4 lb. bone-in beef short ribs (6 to 8 pieces)
salt & pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 celery stalk, 1/4-inch dice
2 carrots, 1/4-inch dice
3/4 cup shallot, fine dice
1 tbsp minced garlic
3 tbsp tomato paste
3/4 tsp Aleppo chili, crushed
1 bay leaf
1 tsp fresh thyme, chopped
1/2 cup beef broth
3/4 cup red wine
1 tbsp fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

  1. Soak a tagine according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Place the tagine on a diffuser over medium-high heat and warm 1 tbsp of the olive oil.
  2. Season the short ribs on all sides with salt and pepper. Dredge the ribs in the flour until evenly coated, shaking off the excess. Add half of the ribs to the tagine and sear until well browned on all sides, about 10 minutes total; transfer to a plate. Repeat with 1 tbsp of the olive oil and the remaining ribs.
  3. Reduce the heat to medium and warm the remaining 1 tbsp olive oil. Add the celery, carrots and shallot and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned, 7 to 8 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste and cook for 1 minute. Add the Aleppo chili, bay leaf, thyme, broth, wine, salt and pepper and bring to a simmer. Return the ribs to the tagine.
  4. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and cook, turning the ribs occasionally, until the meat is tender, 4.5 to 5 hours.
  5. Garnish the ribs with the parsley and serve immediately with mashed potatoes. Serves 4.

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Filed under Beef, Comfort food, Meat

Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Lemon Zest-Thyme Marinade

This is a favorite go to dinner Chef John and I like to make.  I normally serve with roasted potatoes, fennel, and onion and a side salad.  It is a Michael Ruhlman recipe. – ts
Chef John says: If you haven’t noticed already, I’m a big fan of all things pork. When I’m having a hard time thinking of something to make, I’ll turn to this recipe. It’s really quick and easy, probably takes about 15 min total to prepare the marinade. Also, I find it to be more rewarding to create your own marinade rather than just pouring something out of the bottle (which I have no problem doing). I’d let this marinate for at least a few hours but letting it go over night is even better.

1 pork tenderloin
salt to taste
1/2 cup olive oil
zest from two lemons
3 cloves garlic, smashed with a knife
1 shallot, thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon coarsely cracked black pepper
1 teaspoon coarsely cracked coriander
2 tablespoons brown sugar
a bunch of fresh thyme
1/4 cup white wine

  1. Season the pork with plenty of kosher or sea salt.
  2. In a small pan combine the oil, zest, garlic, shallot, pepper, coriander, brown sugar, and 7 or 8 stems of thyme and cook it over medium high heat until the garlic and shallots are bubbling.  Add the wine, bring the oil back up to heat for a few minutes, then remove the pan from the heat (it should cook for about 10 minutes in all) and allow it to cool till it’s not hot to the touch.
  3. Pour it over the pork, add several more stems of fresh thyme, and let it marinate a half hour (or for up to three days, refrigerated, if you’re making this ahead).
  4. Prepare a hot grill and cook the pork, removing the thyme stems, but keep as much of the aromats as will adhere to the pork, to medium rare.

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Filed under Main Course, Marinades, Pork

Roasted Veggie Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette

This is by far my favorite salad The Chef has made to date. And not just because I got to eat it while watching The. Most. Shocking. Bachelor. Finale. EVER. (Which it wasn’t even – I mean, Brad picked Emily. That girl was so good-looking even I was in love with her, and I usually only go for Latinas. Sup Eva Mendes.)
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But I digress. Whenever you give me roasted mushrooms and tomatoes of any kind, I am happy, and the combination of both with the crunchy walnuts was fantastic. The Chef says the tangy vinaigrette is also great as a sauce on chicken or fish. I just thought it would be highly drinkable… if you’re into that sort of thing.
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Lemon Vinaigrette:
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
1/2 shallot, minced
zest of one lemon
1 clove garlic, minced
salt and pepper to taste

  1. In a mixing bowl, add everything except oil and combine.
  2. Slowly add oil to emulsify.

Roasted Veggie Salad:
1 pound portabella mushrooms, sliced
arugula, half of a container
6 *yellow tomatoes, quartered
crumbled goat cheese, a few “sprinkles” (We’re very technical here.)
walnuts, chopped, a few “handfuls”
salt and pepper to taste

  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Toss mushrooms and tomatoes in oil, salt and pepper. Lay out on sheet pan and roast for 20 minutes. (The Chef likes to serve these veggies at room temp, and I agree.)
  3. Toss arugula with dressing and top with veggies, goat cheese, and walnuts.

*You can obviously use red tomatoes if necessary, but these are prettier and have a great flavor, so try to snag some if you can.
**Also fairly obvious is the fact that this picture is not of the same version of the salad written above. Mainly because I was too involved in finding out whether or not Chantal was gonna wig out and deck Brad when he basically denied ever liking her on “After the Final Rose” (She didn’t – LAME.), and I forgot to take a photo. The Chef says he makes this a lot, though, so we”ll replace this one shortly.

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Filed under Marinades, Salad, Salad dressings, Side dishes, Veggies

Seared Pork Tenderloin with Mustard Pan Sauce

I’d say you can go two ways with this tenderloin: served warm as a main dish with German Braised Veggies or the classic, Southern buffet way: cold on Sister Schubert rolls. Either way it’s pure nummy.

Tenderloin:
1 pork tenderloin
1 tablespoon of vegetable oil
salt and pepper to taste

Sauce:
1 shallot, thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
2 oz of red wine
8 oz of beef stock
2 tsp prepared whole grain mustard
1 tsp butter

  1. Preheat oven to 325.
  2. Heat a saute pan with the oil and season the tenderloin with salt and pepper.
  3. When the oil is just about to smoke, sear off tenderloin (sear all sides until golden brown). Place pan in a 325 degree oven until tenderloin reaches an internal temp of 130.
  4. Remove pork and let rest on cutting board. Place pan back on stove over medium heat.
  5. Sweat shallots and garlic. Deglaze with red wine and reduce by half.
  6. Add the stock and mustard and reduce until the sauce coats the back of a spoon.
  7. Pull off heat, strain, and swirl in butter.

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Filed under Main Course, Meat, Party food, Pork

Runyan’s Butternut Squash, Sausage & Sage Pasta Sauce

Runyan has decided to step up and represent the Mid-Atlantic region with this nummy-looking sauce. I believe this is the first offensive move by the easterly part of the U.S. in what promises to be a coastal recipe war. Pitts, you are on notice.

1 medium butternut squash, peeled and cubed into 1″ cubes
3 sweet or spicy Italian sausages, casings removed
1/2 teaspoon sage (I used dried, use more if using fresh)
1 half pint heavy cream
1 cup fontina cheese shredded
2 cloves garlic chopped
1 shallot chopped
1/2 cup white wine

  1. Brown sausage in pan, crumbling it up as it cooks. When mostly cooked but not all the way, remove from pan. Leave the grease unless there is too much.
  2. Add shallot and cook for 2 minutes before adding garlic, butternut squash, and salt and pepper. Stir.
  3. Add half cup white wine and put on lid. Cook/steam on medium heat for 10 minutes.
  4. Check to see if the squash is soft; if not, cook a bit longer. When squash is soft, add sausage and sage.
  5. Add cream and reduce heat way down to simmer. Check for salt and pepper but keep in mind that cheese is going in next. When cream is warm, add cheese and mix well.
  6. Serve with long pasta or short.  When pasta is done, drain and add to warm sauce cooking for an additional 30 seconds.

I love the direction “serve with long pasta or short.” Runyan’s giving you culinary freedom, y’all. Respect.

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Filed under Pasta, Pork, Sauces