Tag Archives: green onion

Asian Mignonette

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As I mentioned in the classic cocktail post, an Asian Mignonette is an interesting and delectable variation for an oyster topping.

Having only tried it a few times at the schmanciest of restaurants, I was intrigued to see how the homemade version would stack up. Turns out: really darn well.

This particular blend has a depth of flavor that lends a whole new element to the oyster, but it still brings the tang you’re looking for with an oyster garnish. Again, if you’re working with quality oysters, I say go naked: splash of sauce and slurp.

1/2 cup of sake
2 shallots, minced
1/4 cup of minced ginger
1/2 cup of rice wine vinegar
3 teaspoons of soy sauce
3 tablespoon of chopped cilantro
3 green onions, chopped

  1. Mix all ingredients.
  2. Let sit for 30 minutes.
  3. Serve.
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Filed under Asian food, Sauces, Toppings

Les Carlos Shrimp & Crawfish Dip

This is another holiday dish that I will definitely be putting into the year-round rotation.

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I first had this dip at a Christmas party 8 years ago, and I searched for the recipe for 5 years before someone pointed out to me that it had been right under my nose – namely in Heart & Soul – the whole time.

While this does take a little while to prep and cook, it is totally worth your time. And not just because it is delicious, but also because each step of the cooking process leaves the house smelling better than the last. Butter, creole seasoning, fresh herbs and seafood? I’m on board.

Two words of caution: Make sure to thaw and rinse your seafood well to get rid of any unnecessary fishiness, and make sure you use 2 teaspoons of creole seasoning and not 2 tablespoons at each of the saute steps. Not that anyone has ever ruined 2 pounds of perfectly good seafood by doing that, but I’d like to prevent it if at all possible…

1 lb crawfish tails
1 lb shrimp, raw and roughly chopped
1.5 sticks of butter (.75 cups)
6 tsp creole seasoning
1 cup onion, finely chopped
1 cup green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 cup celery, finely chopped
1/2 cup red bell pepper, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
6 tbsp fresh basil (3 dried)
3 tbsp fresh thyme (1.5 dried)
3 tbsp tomato paste
1/4 cup flour
1 bunch green onions, finely chopped
hot sauce

  1. Melt half a stick of butter in a large skillet. Add 2 tsp creole seasoning. Add crawfish and saute for 5 minutes. Pour crawfish and butter into a bowl and set aside.
  2. Melt half a stick of butter in a the skillet, add 2 tsp creole seasoning, and saute shrimp in butter for 3 minutes. Add shrimp to bowl with crawfish.
  3. Melt the rest of the butter in the skillet with 2 tsp creole seasoning. Add onion, green and red peppers, celery, and garlic and saute for 5 minutes or until veggies are tender.
  4. Add fresh herbs, tomato paste and flour to veggie mixture in the skillet and stir constantly for 5 minutes.
  5. Process half of crawfish/shrimp mixture in blender (do not puree).
  6. Add crawfish/shrimp mixture (both processed and not-processed halves) to skillet and mix thoroughly.
  7. Stir in green onions and add hot sauce to taste.
  8. Serve with Thin Garlic Crostinis and get out of the way.

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Filed under Appetizers, Cajun food, Christmas, Dips, Seafood, Special Occasion

Deviled Eggs

It is holiday season which means lots of family and friends entertaining.  It is always nice to have an easy but tasty appetizer to either serve or bring to a dinner party.  I love me some deviled eggs, and it is so simple to make.  There are tons of recipes out there and different variations (I recommend trying Martha’s Avocado Deviled Eggs).  I personally love straight forward mayo, mustard, egg style deviled eggs.  Nothing fancy in this recipe!  This one is courtesy of a good friend down in NOLA, Chef Anne.  She served these one time, and I seriously think I ate a dozen.  I made these last night, and Chef John and Claire (Mexican corn lover and daughter of the famous Peg from Peg’s Destin Shrimps) gave this recipe the the thumbs up!- ts

Chef Anne’s note:  You can boil the eggs and make the mixture a few hours in advance, store it in the frdige, and then put it all together right before people are ready to eat them.  Also, I use small eggs because they are more bite-size

1 dozen eggs
2 teaspoons dijon mustard (Zataran’s creole mustard is best)
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 Tbsp minced shallot
dashes of hot sauce (perhaps Sriracha!)
Salt and pepper
Paprika and Green Onion for garnish

  1. Hard boil the eggs.  Fill up a large saucepan half-way with water and gently add the eggs. Cover the eggs with at least an inch of water. Add a teaspoon of vinegar to the water.  Add a pinch of salt to the water. Bring the water to a boil. Cover, and remove from heat. Let sit covered for 12-15 minutes. Drain hot water from pan and run cold water over the eggs. (At this point if you crack the egg shells while the eggs are cooling, it will make it easier to peel the shells.) Let sit in the cool water a few minutes, changing the water if necessary to keep it cool.  If you kinda roll the eggs on the counter, the shells get all cracked and are a little easier to peel.
  2. Peel the eggs. Using a sharp knife, slice each egg in half, lengthwise. Gently remove the yolk halves and place in a small mixing bowl. (Egg yolks come out really easily, just kinda use a spoon and gently pop them out into the bowl).  Arrange the egg white halves on a serving platter.
  3. Using a fork, mash up the yolks and add mustard, mayonnaise, shallot, tabasco, chopped green onions (same some for on top) and salt and pepper to taste. Spoon egg yolk mixture into the egg white halves. (You can also use like a cake decorator thing, but I just kinda wing it…) Sprinkle with paprika and chopped green onions.
Optional: add chopped herbs to the mixture

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Filed under Appetizers, Comfort food, Party food, Snacks

Lemon Crab Salad

The Chef brought this home last week for us to share. For two days I stole bites every time I was in the kitchen until he gave up and said I could have the rest. Which was good… because I had already eaten it. What I’m saying is, this is badass.

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Clearly this recipe targets the rich and famous as it requires a whole pound of lump crab meat, but it is worth every penny. (I say this as a person who got hers for free, but whatevs. Details.)

For those of you who are budget-conscious, The Chef would like to remind you that you can use a lot of different things to supplement the crab if you don’t want to burn your whole paycheck on this dish. Cooked shrimp, lobster or scallops can be substituted for part of the crab, and I’ll attest that the 1/2 shrimp-1/2 crab combo is plenty delicious. Just please, for the love, leave the krab out of it.

The Chef suggests serving this on avocado halves as a first course or with crackers or crispy wontons. I, however, think this salad is something that should remain between a girl and her spoon.

1 lb jumbo lump crab meat
1/2 cup mayo
juice of 2 lemons
zest of 1 lemon
salt and pepper to taste
half bunch of green onion, chopped
1 tbsp fresh tarragon, fresh minced

  1. Drain crab and pick through for shells.
  2. Add everything except crab to a mixing bowl. Gently fold in crab meat.
  3. Eat immediately, preferably alone, before anyone else can get their hands on it.

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Filed under Appetizers, Salad, Seafood, Shellfish

Bacon Tomato Pasta Salad ~ a.k.a. Bogie’s Pasta Salad

So this pasta salad was originally called “BLT Pasta Salad” until The Chef rightly (and a little smugly) pointed out that there is not, in fact, an “L” in it. To which I replied, “Um yuh-huh! Little tiny cucumbers. So there. What do you think about that?!”

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Turns out he thought that was stupid, which it was, so I renamed it. Basically it’s my copyright-infringement version of Bogie’s pasta salad but with bacon. Because… you know what, no. It needs no explanation. Bacon is its own reason.

As per usual with my pasta salads, I am not entirely sure about the amount of mayo, so you’ll just have to taste and add to your desired level of saturation. (The ladies reading this will appreciate that I’ve avoided using the words “moist” or “wet” here. Yes, we all hate those words. They’re icky, so just shut up about it.)

Also, if you are firmly anti-cucumber as I am, do not fear – if you dice the little buggers up tiny enough, you will barely even notice them. (But they are an integral part of the “Bogie’s” taste and the “saturation” factor, so don’t leave them out completely.)

And there you have it. This pasta will make your transition from lake to tailgate smooth – and delicious – so make sure you have some on hand.

1 package rotini, cooked al dente*
5 roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1 large cucumber, seeded and minced**
5 green onions, chopped (white parts discarded)
1.5 cups mayo (Duke’s!)
6 strips bacon (preferably Wright), cooked and chopped
1 cup sour cream
juice of 2 lemons at serving time
chili powder
Cavender’s

  1. While the pasta is still hot, mix all ingredients in large bowl. (You actually don’t have to do it while it’s hot, but the mayo coats everything better that way, so proceed as you will.)
  2. Add chili power, Cavender’s or your favorite all-purpose seasoning to taste.
  3. Chill (at least a few hours, preferably over night). Before serving, check to make sure the pasta is not too dry and add more, ahem, “saturating” ingredients as necessary and the lemon juice.

*Make sure to cook the pasta a little under as it will sit and soften in the mayo. Also, don’t buy multicolored rotini for this because it’s much prettier red, white and green. But that might be the OCD talking, so you do what you want.
**Mince the life out of that little effer. I mean it. No big chunks of cucumber here. The slime will not stand.

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Filed under Comfort food, Party food, Pasta, Salad, Side dishes, Southern food