Tag Archives: rice

Sewell’s Shrimp Creole

This recipe comes from JR’s friend Sewell, a good ‘ole Georgia boy who knows the importance of Cajun seasoning in anything that bears the “Creole” name. I normally wouldn’t post something from a Georgia fan two days before their (likely not epic but here’s-to-hoping good) battle with the Vols, but this looks too darn good to ignore.


The main thing to remember with this recipe is that juice is your friend. Don’t drain anything here. All of that sauce the ‘maters are packed in provides flavor and richness, so feel free to add more as you go if your Creole looks a little thirsty.

2-3 links andouille sausage, sliced
1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 small green bell pepper, chopped
1 small sweet onion, chopped
4 stalks of celery, chopped
1 ear of corn, cut off the cob (or 1/2 cup frozen)
4-8 cloves of garlic, minced
2-3 large cans diced tomatoes (Italian) + juice
1-2 cans of rotel + juice
1 cup rice, cooked according to package directions
Cajun seasoning
olive oil or butter
hot sauce

  1. Brown sausage in large dutch oven with olive oil. Remove and reserve.
  2. Saute bell pepper, onion, celery, and garlic in same pan until soft (about 5-10 minutes) with the Cajun seasoning.
  3. Add sausage, corn, tomatoes, and rotel.
  4. Let simmer for 15-20 minutes.
  5. Add shrimp and cook for three minutes.
  6. Serve over rice with hot sauce.

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Filed under Cajun food, Comfort food, Main Course, Seafood, Shellfish

Besh (Best) Jambalaya

We cooked this on one of our last dinner parties at our apartment in NYC.  It was amazing.  We made a huge pot of it, and I am pretty sure there were no leftovers.  People were stuffing their face and going for third helpings.  Chef John and I love “My New Orleans” cookbook.  Other then the obvious fact that his recipe’s are amazing, I also love this cookbook because John Besh describes the cooking process and why it is important to do certain things while you are cooking.   -ts

Chef John says: If you don’t have John Besh’s book, “My New Orleans,” than you need to have your head examined, go buy it. In my opinion, he’s easily one of the most talented and innovative chefs out there and best of all he likes to use pork… a lot. I’m trying to eat my way through his book at the moment but wanted to share with you his Jambalaya recipe. Prior to this, I’ve never tried to make it on my own and I was really surprised by how easy it was.  This is one of my favorite comfort foods and provides a great base for a long night out.

2 pounds bacon, diced
3 pounds andouille sausage, diced
1/2 cup lard (OPTIONAL- we did not use bc there is enough pork fat)
2 pounds fresh pork sausage, removed from casings
8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs, roughly cut into 1-inch pieces
Freshly ground black pepper
6 large onions, diced
4 bell peppers, seeded and diced
10 stalks celery, diced
12 cloves garlic, minced
9 cups converted Louisiana white rice
2 teaspoons dried thyme
2 dried bay leaves
3 tablespoons pimention de la Vera or smoked paprika
2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon celery salt
6 cups canned crushed tomatoes
6 cups chicken stock
5 pounds Louisiana white shrimp or other wild American shrimp, peeled and deveined
3 bunches green onions, chopped

  1. First, you’ll need to heat a very large pot 3-5 gallons) over high heat until it is hot, then reduce the heat to moderate.  This will allow the heat to be uniform all over, preventing those little hot spots that are likely to burn.
  2. Render the bacon with the sausages and the lard in the hot pot, stirring slowly with a long wooden spoon or a spade.  While the pork is rendering, go ahead and season the chicken thighs with salt and pepper.  Add the chicken to the pot, stirring, and cook until the chicken becomes golden brown, about 5 minutes.
  3. After the chicken as browned, add the onions to the pot and all them to caramelize, about 15 minutes.  Add the bell peppers, celery, and garlic and cook for about 5 minutes.  Continue stirring from time to time so that everything in the pot cooks evenly.
  4. Next add the rice, thyme, bay leaves, pimention, cayenne, 2 tablespoons salt, 1 tablespoons black pepper, and the celery salt to the pot and cook, stirring often for 3 minutes.
  5. Increase the heat to high and add the tomatoes and chicken stock to the pot,  Bring the stock to a boil.  Reduce the heat do medium low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  6. While the rice is cooking in the covered pot, season the shrimp with salt and pepper and save them, along with the green onions, to be added at the last minutes.
  7. After the rice as simmered for 15 minutes, go ahead and remove the lid from the pot and fold int he shrimp and green onions.  Turn off the heat and let everything continue to to cook in the hot covered pot for an additional 10 minutes.  Remove the lid, fluff the jambalaya and serve.


Filed under Cajun food, Chicken, Comfort food, Main Course, Party food, Pork, Seafood

Lemongrass Ginger Rice

This is the less-creamy, more tangy version of your standard coconut rice. Lemongrass and ginger are always fun. Plus you get to infuse something here, and that makes everyone feel much more culinarily-empowered.

2 cups of vegetable stock (recipe coming soon)
2 lemongrass stalks, chopped
2-inch piece of ginger, chopped
1 cup of jasmine rice
splash of coconut milk
salt to taste

  1. Heat stock in a sauce pot. Add ginger and lemongrass.  Simmer for 15 minutes.
  2. Strain Stock. Add rice to pot with infused stock. Bring to boil.
  3. Once it comes to a boil, cover and turn off heat. Let steam for 20 minutes.
  4. Add a splash of coconut milk, stir and serve.


Filed under Asian food, Rice, Side dishes

Ginger Fried Rice

Chef John and I use my wok at the least 2 times a week because well I have an unhealthy relationship with Asian food and we love my wok.  We make about a dozen varieties of fried rice, but Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s is hands down the best recipe.  It is so simple and clean yet extremely flavorful; it’s unlike any other fried rice I have had.  Like all fried-rice dishes, you must start this one with leftover rice; fresh rice is simply too moist.  Bittman suggests using white rice from Chinese takeout; not a bad call. The recipe calls for jasmine rice, almost any rice will do as long as it is a day old.  Also the original recipe calls for cooking the rice in rendered fat; I am just using peanut oil.  Unlike other one pot fried rice dishes, this one has a couple steps but is 100% worth the effort.  I highly recommend sprinkling some fried pancetta along with the ginger and garlic.  Of course Jean-George serves this by molding it into beautiful mounds and tops each with egg and garnish.   -ts
A Mark Bittman adaption of a Jean-Georges Vongerichten recipe, with a few tweaks.  Serves 2.

1/3 – 1/2 cup peanut oil
2 tablespoons minced garlic
2 tablespoons minced ginger
1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white and light green parts only, rinsed and dried
1 cup day-old cooked rice, preferably jasmine, at room temperature
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons sesame oil
2 teaspoons soy sauce

  1. In a large skillet, heat peanut oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp and brown. With a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels and salt lightly.
  2. Reduce heat under skillet to medium-low and add 2 tablespoons oil and leeks. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very tender but not browned. Season lightly with salt.
  3. Raise heat to medium and add rice. Cook, stirring well, until heated through and almost crispy. Season to taste with sesame oil and soy sauce.
  4. In a nonstick skillet, fry eggs in remaining oil, sunny-side-up, until edges are set but yolk is still runny.
  5. Divide rice among two dishes. Top each with an egg and drizzle a little more sesame oil and soy sauce. Sprinkle crisped garlic and ginger (and pancetta if using) over everything and serve.

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Filed under Asian food, Comfort food, Main Course, Party food, Rice, Side dishes

Spicy Tomato Rice (“Red Rice”)

Dot gave me The Lee Brothers Southern Cookbook for Christmas a few years ago and, as sometimes happens when you get cookbooks (or enormous soup pots or aprons) very often, it hasn’t gotten its fair share of airtime.

So yesterday I did what any rational 28-year-old woman would do: I threw a hissy fit and insisted we incorporate it into our dinner despite the fact we already had plenty of food and we had no idea whether or not it would be good.

As is seldom the case, my age-inappropriate behavior  paid off. This dish had a lot of flavor yet was not difficult to make (though I did read the recipe 10+ times because my mind was only working at half-speed yesterday). I think The Chef dosed it with some extra red pepper flakes which gave it great heat.

I’d even be willing to stake RipleyPickles’ name on this one because I totally don’t care about rice, but this was legitimately nummy. I’m thinking next time we amp it up with andouille and take it to main-dish status.

4 slices bacon, cut into small dice (kitchen shears make this process much easier)
1 yellow onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1.5 cups long-grain rice
2.5 cups chicken broth
28-oz. can stewed tomatoes
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (+ more if ya nasty)
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon salt & pepper
Cavendar’s or Tony Chachere’s to taste (because my tastebuds are completely whacked by MSG-goodness, so season at your own risk)

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. In a food processor puree tomatoes, crushed red pepper flakes, paprika and seasoning. Set aside.
  3. In a large skillet fry bacon, remove with slotted spoon and set aside.
  4. Saute onion and garlic in bacon fat over medium heat until soft. Add rice and cook for 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add 2 cups broth and mix.
  5. Add tomato mixture to skillet and bring to a boil then reduce and cover. Simmer for 20 minutes.
  6. Make sure rice is still slightly “soupy” (add extra broth if necessary), and transfer to oven. Bake for 25 minutes or until liquid has been absorbed.
  7. Stir in bacon and serve. Nummo.

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Filed under Comfort food, Rice, Side dishes, Southern food