Tag Archives: stock

Tom Yum Soup & Shrimp Stock

I was cleaning up the ole WordPress today and ran across this dusty draft in my backlog. How it is possible to forget such a yummy recipe – especially one that involves not one but two types of soup – is beyond me. Let’s remedy that, shall we?

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This is 2-for-1 in that it is The Chef’s recipe for both Shrimp Stock and Tom Yum Soup. Usually, if you don’t have the time or patience to make your stock, you can buy it; but the ingredient list on this sucker makes me think you should go traditional or go home.

And I’d wager that the flavor will be well worth it. Tom Yum is spicy, brothy Asian goodness, and the longer it simmers and permeates your house, the better it will be when you finally slurp it down.

Shrimp Stock:
1 tablespoon of olive oil
shells from 1 1/2 pounds of shrimp (shrimp reserved)
1 red bell pepper, chopped
stems of 1 lb shiitake shrooms
2 lemongrass stalks, rough chopped
3 inch piece of ginger, rough chopped
2 celery stalks, rough chopped
1 onion, rough chopped
2 tsp of tomato paste
1/2 cup rice wine (mirin)
enough water to cover

  1. Add oil to stock pot. Add shrimp shells and cook them until pink.
  2. Add the rice wine.
  3. Add the rest of the ingredients and enough water to cover.  Simmer for about 45 minutes. Strain.

Tom Yum Soup:
1 tbsp peanut oil
1.5 lbs shrimp
2 tsp sesame oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 inch piece of ginger, chopped*
2 lemongrass stalks, chopped*
3 Thai chilies*
1/2 red onion, sliced thin
2 celery stalks, cut on the diagonal into 1-inch slices
1 tbsp chili powder
1 tbsp Thai fish sauce
1 lb mushrooms, sliced
8 cups shrimp stock
2 cups cilantro, no stems
1 lime, cut into quarters for garnish
cilantro for garnish

  1. Heat large pot over medium heat. Add peanut oil. Then add garlic, chiles, ginger, lemongrass, onions, celery, sesame oil, and chili powder.  Saute, stirring occasionally, until the onion softens, 5 to 10 minutes.
  2. Add shrimp, mushrooms, and stock. Cook for about 15 minutes.
  3. Add fish sauce and cilantro.
  4. *Remove lemongrass, ginger, and Thai chilies.
  5. Serve with lime wedges and cilantro sprigs. Add soy sauce if you need salt.

The Chef warns that you will definitely have leftover stock, so freeze it for next time, and your Tom will be Yum in no time.

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Filed under Asian food, Main Course, Soups

Roasted Veggie Stock

How about this beautiful autumn weather, nummy? It’s balmy and breezy and cool and simply delightful outside, no?

Actually, no; it is not. It’s going to be 88 degrees in Nashville this afternoon, and I just spent my lunch hour  sweating through my long-sleeved shirt on the Calypso patio, so we Southerners still have a ways to go, as they say.

behindtheskillet.blogspot.com

Nonetheless, it was 67 degrees when I left the house this morning and we even managed to cook out last night without me throwing up from the humidity. Also, we’ve gotten to watch The Vols play football – and actually win, no less – two Saturdays in a row, so I say it’s fall, dad-gummit.

In that vein, we’re gonna kick things off with a roasted veggie stock that can serve as the base for any seasonal soup you like. Roasting the veggies is super easy but will give you much more depth of flavor* than just doing a basic broth, so don’t go cutting corners.

8 oz of mushrooms
2 carrots, medium dice
8 garlic cloves, peeled
2 onions, medium dice
1 celery stalk, small dice
4 sprigs of thyme

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Coat all veggies in oil and roast on sheet pan for 1 hour.
  3. Remove veggies to a stockpot, then deglaze the hot roasting pan by adding 1 cup of water.
  4. Scrape up any browned bits, then add the liquid to the post along with 6 cups of cold water and the thyme sprigs.
  5. Simmer gently uncovered for 1 hour. Strain and store. Or use immediately to make The Chef’s Tortilla Soup. Easy and delish.

*Depth of flavor is my one bit of pretentious kitchen-speak for this post. We may have been out of the blogging game for a while, but that doesn’t mean the Cooking Channel hasn’t been playing on an obnoxious loop in the background of our lives the whole time. Osmosis, baby,

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Filed under Soups, Veggies

Braised Osso Buco with Citrus Gremolata

I know what you’re thinking: that is one high-falutin’ recipe title right there. It sounds like something Frasier & Niles might eat and something you straight can’t afford. (I’ve neglected Frasier references for some time now, and as a Cheers cast member and spin-off star in his own right, that simply has to be remedied.)

In any case, I bought osso bucoItalian for “bone with a hole” – from the friendly Newman Farm folks at the Memphis Farmers Market, and I had absolutely no idea what it was. (I was aiming for pork belly, but the smallest portion they had was 11 pounds, and even on my fattest of days I might lose the battle against that much pork.)

The Chef later informed me that osso buco is simply a veal shank, meaning baby cow’s leg (which is obviously super sad but also pretty delicious – sorry PETA!). We braised this sucker for 3 hours, and it eventually fell right off the bone like the books say. Moo!

Osso Buco
2 lbs veal shanks
1 celery stalk, diced
1 carrot, diced
1 onion, diced
1 cup white wine
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup of beef or chicken stock
1 can of chopped tomatoes with juice
2 strips of orange zest
salt and pepper
few sprigs of fresh thyme

Citrus Gremolata
2 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 tsp garlic, minced
1 tsp grated lemon zest
1 tsp grated orange zest

  1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
  2. Season shanks with salt and pepper. Heat olive oil in a dutch oven over high heat. Brown shanks on all sides.
  3. Remove shanks and add veggies. Saute until well carmelized.  Then add tomatoes, stock, thyme, bay leaf, orange zest, and garlic.
  4. Place shanks back in the dutch oven and bring to a simmer. Then cover and place in oven for 3.5 hours.
  5. Once shanks are pulling away from the bone, remove and puree sauce for a thicker texture.
  6. Top with sauce then gremolata. (The Chef cautions you not to skip this step because the gremolata really brightens up this dish.)
  7. Serve with Blue Cheese Mashed Potatoes and Sauteed Squash, Zucchini & Red Pepper.

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Filed under Italian food, Main Course, Meat

Lemongrass Ginger Rice

This is the less-creamy, more tangy version of your standard coconut rice. Lemongrass and ginger are always fun. Plus you get to infuse something here, and that makes everyone feel much more culinarily-empowered.

2 cups of vegetable stock (recipe coming soon)
2 lemongrass stalks, chopped
2-inch piece of ginger, chopped
1 cup of jasmine rice
splash of coconut milk
salt to taste

  1. Heat stock in a sauce pot. Add ginger and lemongrass.  Simmer for 15 minutes.
  2. Strain Stock. Add rice to pot with infused stock. Bring to boil.
  3. Once it comes to a boil, cover and turn off heat. Let steam for 20 minutes.
  4. Add a splash of coconut milk, stir and serve.

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Filed under Asian food, Rice, Side dishes

Chicken Picatta

I have been neglecting m’boy Wikipedia for a while now, and that stops here. The ‘pedia tells me that “picatta” just means “to be pounded flat” in Italian. And I like that.

Not only because these little suckers will fry up right nice because they are flat and even all over but also because you get to use that tiny little mallet to work out some of your aggression. That little hammer is somehow adorable and violent all at once, and I always imagine a furious little Leprechaun-lumberjack using it. And that clearly makes me happy.

4 chicken breasts, boneless and skinless
2 oz of olive oil
seasoned flour
2 teaspoons shallots, minced
2 teaspoons garlic, minced
4 oz white wine
1/2 cup chicken stock
2 tsp of chopped parsley
2 tbsp capers
1 oz of lemon juice
2 tbsp butter

  1. Lightly pound chicken breast and then dredge in seasoned flour.
  2. Heat the oil in a saute pan. Cook the chicken until golden brown.
  3. Remove from pan, add shallots and garlic and cook until translucent.
  4. De-glaze pan with wine. Add chicken stock, parsley, capers, and lemon juice.
  5. Let it reduce for 2 minutes and then finish the sauce with butter. Salt and pepper it to taste and serve with your favorite pasta.

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Filed under Chicken, Italian food, Main Course

Barrett’s Basic Beef Broth

My love affair with broth is almost as well-documented (and maligned) as my common law marriage to pickle juice, so this post is a foregone conclusion. The Chef made this just the other day “for fun” (a reason I obviously gave him crap for but secretly was super pleased with).

He points out that the 24-hour cooking time provides the added bonus of making the house smell amazing, and that is definitely true. Plus it freezes well, so he suggests you make a, shall we say, “boat”load? Sure. Boatload. Make that much.

5 lbs of beef bones
5 celery stalks, roughly chopped
2 large red onion, roughly chopped
4 carrots, roughly chopped
handful of thyme sprigs
water

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Place bones and veggies on a sheet pan. Rub with oil and roast until golden brown (about 30 minutes).
  3. Place bones and veggies in a large pot. Cover with water (at least 4 quarts). Add thyme and simmer for 24 hours.
  4. Strain.
  5. Make something awesome with it. Obviously I suggest soup. Or just drinking it with a straw. Whichev.

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Filed under Beef, Soups

BB’s Tortilla Soup

Despite The Chef’s unfortunate aversion to making standard, run-of-the-mill soups, I whined enough to finally get him to make me some tortilla. And it was anything but standard. I even got his brother-in-law JR to back me up on the fabulosity of this, so maybe that will give me some leverage when I beg him to make it again.

2 tsp vegetable oil
1 onion, diced
1 poblano pepper, diced
1 red bell pepper, diced
2 jalapenos, minced
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp oregano
1 can of chopped green chilies
2.5 cans of diced tomatoes
1 tbsp of chili powder
1/2 tbsp cumin
1 1/2 quart of chicken stock
3 cups of shredded cooked chicken
salt and pepper to taste

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat.  Add all of veggies except tomatoes.  Cook until soft and caramelized (this is the most important part of making this soup right).
  2. Then add tomatoes, stock, chili powder, and cumin.  Simmer for about an hour.
  3. Then add chicken, heat through, and serve. Garnish with fried tortilla strips, chopped cilantro, a squirt of a lime, and sliced avocados.

I also dose this up with some shredded Mexi cheese, but that’s your judgment call to make. The Chef’s Mexican Crema would also be a welcome addition. This soup becomes even nummier after a few days, so make enough to munch on all week.

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Filed under Chicken, Comfort food, Mexican food, Soups, Southwestern food