Tag Archives: pork

ROMA food

I know I am not good about posting to this blog, but this time I had an excuse!  I have been vacationing in Rome the past 7 days and am now inspired to post a few recipes later this week (always the procrastinator).  Obviously Rome is an amazing city for carb and wine indulging, but more important is their LOVE of pork.  I think I consumed more pig in Rome then I did in Barcelona, which is hard to do.  It was awesome, but the next few days I am only eating iceberg lettuce and drinking coffee, recent pics of Christina Aguilera should inspire me to do this.
Here are a few noteworthy food pictures from the trip along with the restaurant name in case you are planning a trip. I suggest asking Chef Morgan as well, girl has a great list from her abroad days. – ts

L’Enoteca Cul de Sac (near Piazza Navona)- small plates great wine list  http://www.enotecaculdesac.com/

 

 

 

 

Pastificio San Lorenzo- you MUST go here.  It is in an up and coming artsy area behind the termini called San Lorenzo, fun live music venue bars as well around the area; incredible meats and cheese; http://www.pastificiocerere.com/ristorante/index.php

 

 

 

 

 

Il Matriciano- Roman fare by the Vatican; the BEST artichokes I have ever had

 

Pork stand in Marino, a small hill side wine town just outside of Rome- 

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Filed under Italian food, Links, Pasta, Pork, Seafood, Uncategorized

Besh (Best) Jambalaya

We cooked this on one of our last dinner parties at our apartment in NYC.  It was amazing.  We made a huge pot of it, and I am pretty sure there were no leftovers.  People were stuffing their face and going for third helpings.  Chef John and I love “My New Orleans” cookbook.  Other then the obvious fact that his recipe’s are amazing, I also love this cookbook because John Besh describes the cooking process and why it is important to do certain things while you are cooking.   -ts

Chef John says: If you don’t have John Besh’s book, “My New Orleans,” than you need to have your head examined, go buy it. In my opinion, he’s easily one of the most talented and innovative chefs out there and best of all he likes to use pork… a lot. I’m trying to eat my way through his book at the moment but wanted to share with you his Jambalaya recipe. Prior to this, I’ve never tried to make it on my own and I was really surprised by how easy it was.  This is one of my favorite comfort foods and provides a great base for a long night out.

2 pounds bacon, diced
3 pounds andouille sausage, diced
1/2 cup lard (OPTIONAL- we did not use bc there is enough pork fat)
2 pounds fresh pork sausage, removed from casings
8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs, roughly cut into 1-inch pieces
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
6 large onions, diced
4 bell peppers, seeded and diced
10 stalks celery, diced
12 cloves garlic, minced
9 cups converted Louisiana white rice
2 teaspoons dried thyme
2 dried bay leaves
3 tablespoons pimention de la Vera or smoked paprika
2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon celery salt
6 cups canned crushed tomatoes
6 cups chicken stock
5 pounds Louisiana white shrimp or other wild American shrimp, peeled and deveined
3 bunches green onions, chopped

  1. First, you’ll need to heat a very large pot 3-5 gallons) over high heat until it is hot, then reduce the heat to moderate.  This will allow the heat to be uniform all over, preventing those little hot spots that are likely to burn.
  2. Render the bacon with the sausages and the lard in the hot pot, stirring slowly with a long wooden spoon or a spade.  While the pork is rendering, go ahead and season the chicken thighs with salt and pepper.  Add the chicken to the pot, stirring, and cook until the chicken becomes golden brown, about 5 minutes.
  3. After the chicken as browned, add the onions to the pot and all them to caramelize, about 15 minutes.  Add the bell peppers, celery, and garlic and cook for about 5 minutes.  Continue stirring from time to time so that everything in the pot cooks evenly.
  4. Next add the rice, thyme, bay leaves, pimention, cayenne, 2 tablespoons salt, 1 tablespoons black pepper, and the celery salt to the pot and cook, stirring often for 3 minutes.
  5. Increase the heat to high and add the tomatoes and chicken stock to the pot,  Bring the stock to a boil.  Reduce the heat do medium low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  6. While the rice is cooking in the covered pot, season the shrimp with salt and pepper and save them, along with the green onions, to be added at the last minutes.
  7. After the rice as simmered for 15 minutes, go ahead and remove the lid from the pot and fold int he shrimp and green onions.  Turn off the heat and let everything continue to to cook in the hot covered pot for an additional 10 minutes.  Remove the lid, fluff the jambalaya and serve.

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Filed under Cajun food, Chicken, Comfort food, Main Course, Party food, Pork, Seafood

Lexington Vinegar Sauce ~ BBQ Fest 2K11

So okay, I don’t want to be a traitor to my generation and all (Clueless quote intended), but currently the North Carolina BBQ tradition is what’s flooding my Inbox. And until you Memphians step up your game or relinquish your sauce secrets, we’ll publish what’s being pushed, ya hear?

This is the sauce that goes with Lexington Pork Shoulder, and while I’m usually a Memphis BBQ purist, it sounds pretty darn good. Get mixy.

2.5 cups of cider vinegar
1/2 cup ketchup
2 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp hot sauce
4 tsp salt
4 tsp red pepper flakes
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp white pepper
1.5 tbsp rub reserved from Lexington Pork Shoulder

  1. Mix all ingredients & serve. No heat required.

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Filed under Pork, Sauces, Southern food, Toppings

Lexington Pork Shoulder ~ BBQ Fest 2K11

It’s that time again, Memphis. The time when the weather is warm but not yet a sweaty swamp, the work days seem a little bit shorter with a patio to look forward to at the end of the day, and the beer and BBQ flow freely from the banks of the Mississippi.
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Well actually, as most of you know, the Mississippi is giving the proverbial wet finger to all of us this year, so the beer and BBQ will have to flow from the banks of Central Avenue at good ole Tiger Lane. While the riverside breeze will undoubtedly be missed, Memphians know BBQ Fest is about the people, and you can always count on this crowd for a good time.
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In honor of BBQ Fest week, we at Nummy would like to bring you an offering from the kitchen of JR Grosshans. I have yet to taste this succulent selection, but The Chef assures that JR knows how to do a pig right. And I believe him. JR is too good a Southern boy to do pork wrong.
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Rub:
4 tsp sweet paprika
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp white pepper
1 tsp dry mustard
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
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Pork & ‘fixins’ (cuz that’s what we say in The South, y’all):
1 bone-in pork shoulder, 5-7 lbs
hamburger buns
4-6 wood chips or chunks (preferably hickory), soaked for 1 hour in water to cover, then drained
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  1. Make the rub: Mix all ingredients. Set aside 1.5 tbsp vinegar for the sauce.  Sprinkle the remaining rub all over the pork.
  2. Set up grill for indirect heat and preheat to medium low.  Place a large drip pan in the center and toss 1 cup of wood chips on the coals.
  3. Place the pork skin side up in the center of the hot grate over the drip pan and away from the heat and cover grill.  Add 12 fresh coals every hour and 1/2 of wood chips to each side.
  4. Cook until darkly browned on the outside and very tender inside, about 4-6 hours.  The internal temperature should reach 195 degrees.
  5. Pull off grill and cover with foil.  Let rest for at least 20 minutes.
  6. Pull pork into large pieces, discarding any bones or lumps of fat.  Transfer pork the pulled pork to a large aluminum foil pan and stir in 1 to 1.5 cups of vinegar sauce.
  7. Chow.

Eating pig is messy. If you’re not covered with sauce when you’re done, you’re not doing it right.

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Filed under Comfort food, Main Course, Meat, Pork, Rubs, Southern food

Seared Pork Tenderloin with Mustard Pan Sauce

I’d say you can go two ways with this tenderloin: served warm as a main dish with German Braised Veggies or the classic, Southern buffet way: cold on Sister Schubert rolls. Either way it’s pure nummy.

Tenderloin:
1 pork tenderloin
1 tablespoon of vegetable oil
salt and pepper to taste

Sauce:
1 shallot, thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
2 oz of red wine
8 oz of beef stock
2 tsp prepared whole grain mustard
1 tsp butter

  1. Preheat oven to 325.
  2. Heat a saute pan with the oil and season the tenderloin with salt and pepper.
  3. When the oil is just about to smoke, sear off tenderloin (sear all sides until golden brown). Place pan in a 325 degree oven until tenderloin reaches an internal temp of 130.
  4. Remove pork and let rest on cutting board. Place pan back on stove over medium heat.
  5. Sweat shallots and garlic. Deglaze with red wine and reduce by half.
  6. Add the stock and mustard and reduce until the sauce coats the back of a spoon.
  7. Pull off heat, strain, and swirl in butter.

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Filed under Main Course, Meat, Party food, Pork

Pitts’ Braised Pork Shoulder

Well folks, it’s official: Nummy Num Num has hit the west coast. And the illustrious Justin Pitts has thrown a little of his culinary expertise back home to the dirty south in the form of Memphis’ favorite meat. If you’re BBQed out but still need your pork fix, a good braise will definitely satisfy your soul.

2 lbs pork shoulder, cut into 5-6 big chunks
Mirepoix (1 onion, 1 carrot, 2 celery stalks, chopped) – that’s French y’all!
1-2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons tomato paste (one squeeze of the kind in the tube probably= a couple tablespoon
2 TB AP flour
Cup or so of red wine
1 to 1.5 cups beef stock
bunch of parsley
1 sprig rosemary
2-3 sprigs thyme
2-3 bay leaves wrapped up and tied with kitchen string (or just throw them in)
water (optional, to bring liquid level up if needed)

  1. Preheat oven to 325.
  2. Get a big dutch oven. Season pork with S/P and sear it off well in olive oil, set it aside.
  3. Add Mirepoix and sweat it, then add garlic. Stir in tomato paste and cook it for a few minutes to get raw flavor out. Stir in flour and do the same.
  4. Pour in red wine and reduce it by about half.
  5. Put the pork back in. Add the beef stock and herbs until pork is almost covered but not completely swimming in liquid. Add water if needed.
  6. Cover the pot and put it in the oven (or cook over a really low heat on the stove).
  7. Braise the *crap out of it for about 3 hours or until it’s falling apart. Should make enough for 4 people.

*Sorry Pitts, but I had to PG your language up a little here since I know a few parents check in from time to time. I did, however, love your suggestion to serve this over Parmesan polenta in which you said “make polenta, thin it out with butter and milk, and add a s—load of cheese.” I’m pretty sure that’s what Julia Child wrote in all her cookbooks too.

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Filed under Comfort food, French food, Main Course, Pork