Tag Archives: Pitts

Burlison’s Roasted Acorn Squash with Parmesan Bacon Stuffing

The flood of fall recipes here at Nummy has taken a turn toward all things autumn, specifically squash.

elizadomestica.com

While there is no doubt I think squash and gourds look totally adorable as fall table decorations, I really couldn’t care less about eating the little yella fellas most of the time. So I have been delightfully surprised to receive squash recipes that actually look pretty darn delicious.

For example, if I must stuff something with healthy foods like barley, Imma need you to sneak me in some pig and parm as well. And this recipe from Burlison does just that.

Plus, acorn squash is a lovely orangey color, and with only 21 days until we have to restart the countdown to Halloween for the year, you gotta get that fall festivity in wherever you can.

1 acorn squash, split in half and seeded
1 cup prepared pearled barley
2 shallots, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 pieces bacon, chopped into bits
1-2 sprigs fresh thyme
1/2 cup grated parmesan
olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Coat squash lightly in olive oil and salt and pepper.
  3. Roast squash for 30-45 minutes, until almost fork tender.
  4. While squash is roasting, cook bacon. Reserve 1 tablespoon of the grease and ) and shallots. Saute for 1-2 minutes.
  5. Add garlic and saute for 1-2 more minutes.
  6. Add barley and thyme to pan and simmer for 3-4 minutes.
  7. Turn off stove and add cheese, mixing all of the stuffing thoroughly.
  8. Remove squash halves from oven, fill with stuffing and bake for 10 more minutes. Voila.
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Filed under Side dishes, Veggies

Pitts’ Morita Chilaquiles

West Coast represent – we have another update from Mr. Pitts. Take it away Justin:

This is really simple – only 4 ingredients – but the key is the salsa. Pace or some s***like that won’t cut it. This recipe is with Morita chile salsa. Morita is like a Chipotle in that it’s a smoked jalapeno, but it’s smaller, hotter, and comes dried rather than canned in adobo sauce.
(You could use a jarred salsa as long as it’s really good, and salsa verde would even work if that’s your thing.)

Morita Salsa:
8-10 dried moritas
1/2 yellow onion rough chopped
2-3 cloves garlic
3-4 tomatoes seeded and chopped.
water
salt
  1. Toast the moritas in a dry skillet until you start to smell them.
  2. Transfer into a bowl of very hot water and let them reconstitute for 5-10 minutes or until soft and fully re-hydrated.
  3. Remove stems and roughly chop.
  4. Put all the ingredients in blender or food processor and pulse until pureed.
  5. Thin it out with water (if you want it really hot, use the water from the re-hydrating step earlier) as needed. You want it to be thick but not too chunky.
  6. Taste and adjust as needed.
Chilaquiles:
2 eggs per person (at least)
tortillas (ideal) or tortilla strips/chips
sharp cheddar cheese or Cojita
butter
  1. If you want to be a hero, use fresh corn tortillas, cut them into quarters and fry in some 350 veg oil until crisp. Drain on a rack or paper towel and season with salt.
  2. Whisk the eggs and season with s+p. Scramble in a non-stick skillet with butter.
  3. When eggs begin to cook, add handful of cheese and a healthy amount of the salsa and continue scrambling.
  4. When the eggs are about 30 seconds out, add a handful or two of the tortilla strips and stir together. (It’s ok – they are not supposed to stay fully crispy.)
  5. Garnish it with green onion or cilantro if you like, but it’s really good as-is.

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Filed under Appetizers, Mexican food, Southwestern food

Crispy Rosemary Fingerling Potatoes

These are the perfect mate for Pitts’ Rosemary-Dijon Steak. His betrothed insists upon them routinely.
1 bag fingerling potatoes, washed
olive oil
1 head garlic
3 tablespoons coarsely chopped rosemary
salt and pepper
  1. Preheat oven to 425
  2. Cut the potatoes in half lengthwise. In a large bowl, combine potatoes with 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil, season heavily with kosher salt and pepper, and toss to coat in oil.
  3. Arrange potatoes cut side up on a large sheet tray.
  4. Cut bulb of garlic in half, wrap each half in foil with a teaspoon of olive oil and pinch of salt and place on the sheet tray or oven rack. Bake garlic and potatoes for 30 minutes at 425.
  5. Sprinkle rosemary over potatoes and continue cooking another 10-15 minutes or until the cut side of potatoes is brown and blistering.
  6. Remove garlic from foil pouches and squeeze the roasted cloves out over the potatoes.

Pitts likes to eat the leftovers cold dipped in hummus or – even better – warm dipped in truffle aioli. Now he’s speaking my language.

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Filed under Potatoes, Side dishes, Veggies

Rosemary-Dijon Steak Rub

I changed the name of this from “Steak Wet Rub” to “Rosemary-Dijon” because the ingredients made me want to eat it but the original title made me want to make some sort of dirty joke. Another wonderful suggestion from the West Coast. From Pitts: I’ve been doing this a lot lately. It holds up better for a ribeye or strip than a filet and also works great on pork chops, tenderloin, etc.

1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup dijon mustard
2-3 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
pinch of kosher salt
—————————————————–
  1. Combine ingredients into a loose paste. Season steaks with salt and pepper, then liberally brush or rub them with the paste and let marinate 15-20 minutes or longer.
  2. Throw them on the grill. Watch for flame-ups as the olive oil burns off, and move to a cooler part of the grill if necessary.
I almost always serve them with these potatoes because Aimee beats me down about making them. The finished product should be kind of crispy on the outside.

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Filed under Beef, Marinades, Meat, Rubs, Sauces

Pitts’ Braised Pork Shoulder

Well folks, it’s official: Nummy Num Num has hit the west coast. And the illustrious Justin Pitts has thrown a little of his culinary expertise back home to the dirty south in the form of Memphis’ favorite meat. If you’re BBQed out but still need your pork fix, a good braise will definitely satisfy your soul.

2 lbs pork shoulder, cut into 5-6 big chunks
Mirepoix (1 onion, 1 carrot, 2 celery stalks, chopped) – that’s French y’all!
1-2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons tomato paste (one squeeze of the kind in the tube probably= a couple tablespoon
2 TB AP flour
Cup or so of red wine
1 to 1.5 cups beef stock
bunch of parsley
1 sprig rosemary
2-3 sprigs thyme
2-3 bay leaves wrapped up and tied with kitchen string (or just throw them in)
water (optional, to bring liquid level up if needed)

  1. Preheat oven to 325.
  2. Get a big dutch oven. Season pork with S/P and sear it off well in olive oil, set it aside.
  3. Add Mirepoix and sweat it, then add garlic. Stir in tomato paste and cook it for a few minutes to get raw flavor out. Stir in flour and do the same.
  4. Pour in red wine and reduce it by about half.
  5. Put the pork back in. Add the beef stock and herbs until pork is almost covered but not completely swimming in liquid. Add water if needed.
  6. Cover the pot and put it in the oven (or cook over a really low heat on the stove).
  7. Braise the *crap out of it for about 3 hours or until it’s falling apart. Should make enough for 4 people.

*Sorry Pitts, but I had to PG your language up a little here since I know a few parents check in from time to time. I did, however, love your suggestion to serve this over Parmesan polenta in which you said “make polenta, thin it out with butter and milk, and add a s—load of cheese.” I’m pretty sure that’s what Julia Child wrote in all her cookbooks too.

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Filed under Comfort food, French food, Main Course, Pork