Tag Archives: nutmeg

Brantley Milk Punch

Yes, Nummy neglects, I’ve decided the first post in more than a year deserves to be the first one with the married name. In no small coincidence, this recipe is seasonal and full of alcohol, just like our happy newlywed home.

Milk Punch is basically Egg Nog‘s thinner, livelier cousin, which means Egg Nog hates Milk Punch and is always throwing sideways glances at her at family gatherings.

Let it flow.

As the napkin says, let it flow.

But seriously, this drink is easy, delicious and it won’t force you to choose between a seasonal beverage and an extra serving of ham. NEVER force a lady to choose between booze and ham.

Bottom’s up.

2 cups of milk
2 cups of half & half
1 cup bourbon
1/2 cup amaretto liquor
3 tsp vanilla
3/4 cup powdered sugar
Whole nutmeg

  1. Pour all ingredients except powdered sugar and nutmeg into a pitcher and stir.
  2. Whisk in powdered sugar.
  3. Serve over ice and grate fresh nutmeg on top.

These should be served in seasonal glasses. If you don’ have seasonal glasses, exit this blog immediately and never return.

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Filed under Alcohol, Beverages, Christmas, Party food

Chicken Liver Mousse

Time to get fancy at NummyNumNum!  I love chicken livers in all forms.  Having moved to New Orleans, I am extremely lucky to have access to fried chicken liver poboys pretty much at every restaurant.  I probably need to chill out on the NOLA eating as it is bikini season.  Anyways, I love chicken livers, and a mousse version is always welcome in my recipe box. This recipe is so amazing and surprisingly easy.   My good friend Chef Kim made this and gave away in cute mason jars for Christmas gifts.  Chef John and I ate the whole thing in one sitting.  Beware if you are cooking this in an apartment, your place is going to smell.  Keep windows open!  Serve with slices of bread or crackers and cornichons.-ts

2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 garlic clove, minced
1/3 cup Cognac or other brandy
6 oz chicken livers, trimmed (3/4 cup)
5 large egg yolks
1 cup whole milk
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
3/4 stick (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter
Several bay leaves (only fresh; see note, below)

  1. Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Cook shallot in oil in a 10-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 4 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Remove from heat and carefully add Cognac (use caution; if Cognac ignites, shake skillet), then boil until reduced to about 2 tablespoons, 1 to 2 minutes.
  3. Transfer to a blender and add livers and yolks, then purée until smooth. Add milk, flour, salt, pepper, nutmeg, and allspice and blend until combined. Pour into crock, skimming off any foam.
  4. Put crock in a larger baking pan and bake in a water bath until mousse is just set and a small sharp knife inserted in center comes out clean, about 55 minutes.
  5. Melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat, then remove from heat and let stand 3 minutes.
  6. Arrange bay leaves decoratively on top of mousse. Skim froth from butter, then spoon enough clarified butter over mousse to cover its surface, leaving milky solids in bottom of saucepan.
  7. Chill mousse completely, uncovered, about 4 hours. Bring to room temperature about 1 hour before serving.

The bay leaves are decorative, if fresh ones are unavailable no need for using dried.

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Filed under Appetizers, Bread, Chicken, Dips, Party food, Special Occasion

Caribbean Jerk Rub (Wet)

This recipe uses a scotch bonnet, and, if you think about the name of that pepper literally (i.e. a small older Scottish woman dressed like Miss Muffet), I think we can all agree it’s cute as crap. Also, reading the list of spices literally made my mouth water, so it’s probably good as crap too.

1/2 medium yellow onion, chopped
3 scallions, chopped
1 scotch bonnet, cut in half
2 tbsp chopped thyme
2 tsp ground allspice
11/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 ground cloves
1/2 tsp grated nutmeg
1/4 cup  dark rum
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup vegetable oil

  1. Combine all ingredients in a blender and puree into a smooth, thick paste.
  2. Use on pork, chicken, or seafood. It will last for about 3 days. (The rub, that is, not the food. If your food lasts for 3 days you are my grandmother and need to eat more quickly.)

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Filed under Marinades, Rubs, Sauces

Meatballs in Marinara

There’s nothing better than a good meatball. The problem is most meatballs are passable at best and downright TASTELESS at worst. These are anything but. They have a great flavor on their own and are even better seared off and then dropped into the yummiest of sauces to simmer til they sop up all the tomatoey goodness.

1`1/2 lbs of ground beef
10 oz (one tube) of mild country sausage
5 garlic cloves, minced
half of bunch of Italian parsley, minced
salt and pepper to taste
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 cup of Italian breadcrumbs
2 eggs
sprinkle of nutmeg
salt and pepper to taste

  1. Make a mini meatball and cook it in a hot saute pan in a little olive oil. Taste for seasoning before making the rest of the meatballs.
    (Tasting and browning are the key steps to this recipe. Most people who suck at cooking suck because they don’t taste at every step. Don’t be one of them. Also, The Chef almost went postal having to make all these balls by himself, so draft someone for help or do them in advance.)
  2. Roll into balls, brown on all sides, and then simmer in tomato sauce for 30-45 minutes, adding parsley when you add the meatballs. Serve over angel hair pasta. De Cecco is the best brand I’ve ever found and it literally takes 2-3 minutes tops to be ready.

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Filed under Beef, Comfort food, Italian food, Main Course, Meat, Pasta, Pork

Sweet Potato Gnocchi with Sage Brown Butter

I never considered myself a fan of gnocchi until I had some at Andrew Michael. (If you haven’t been there, go immediately – the last time I encountered two dudes from Christan Brothers, they were trying to start a fight outside an MUS football game, so this was a welcome upgrade. That place is the shiz.)

Anyway, I can always get behind anything with brown butter, so I have no doubt this dish is fantastic.

1/2 pound sweet potato
3 oz ricotta cheese, strained for 2 hours
1 oz Parmesan cheese
1/2 tbsp brown sugar
salt to taste
1 pinch of nutmeg
1 cup flour
2 oz butter
2 tbsp fresh sage, chopped

  1. Bake the potatoes with skin on at 350 degrees until tender (takes about an hour)
  2. Peel sweet potatoes and mash. Let cool.
  3. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add ricotta and Parmesan cheese and blend.
  4. Add brown sugar, salt, and nutmeg. Mix in flour 1/4 cup at a time until a soft dough forms.
  5. Turn dough out onto a floured work surface and roll into a 1 inch diameter rope.
  6. Cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces and roll over the tines of a fork to indent.
  7. Boil gnocchi until tender, about 5-6 minutes. Shock in a ice bath.
  8. To finish, brown butter in a saute pan. Add sage, salt and pepper, and gnocchi. Continue to heat until gnocchi is heated through.

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Filed under Comfort food, Italian food, Main Course, Potatoes

Brandy Milk Punch

I am adding this as a new addition to my après ski drinks line up.  Having lived in New Orleans, this cocktail is near and dear to my heart and liver.   Luckily John Besh share’s his favorite rendition in “My New Orleans: The Cookbook” (if you do not own it buy immediately).  Every one of his restaurants in New Orleans serves this drink.  There is a reason; it is great no matter the season. –ts

1 cup Brandy
3 cups milk
3 tablespoons powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Grated nutmeg

  1. Put the brandy, milk, sugar, vanilla and nutmeg into a blender and fill with ice. Blend for 20 seconds.
  2. Strain the mixture into tall glasses filled with fresh crushed ice and serve. This recipe serves four. You may need to add a bit more sugar, so taste a little and sweeten as you go.

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Filed under Alcohol, Beverages, Restaurant Recipes

Potatoes au Gratin

I took like 2 whole years of French in high school (and ironically ended up pretty much taking them again in college from the same teacher), so I thought I was well-equipped to tell you that “au gratin” means “with cheese.” Apparently I’m only half right. It means cooking something either covered in cheese or breadcrumbs or both, so go figure. If I can’t at least use my mad French skillz to translate seamlessly while blogging, I think Hutchison or UT owes my parents some money back.

3 1/4 pounds of Idaho potatoes
5 garlic cloves
32 ounces of milk
ground nutmeg, to taste
kosher salt, to taste
black pepper, to taste
12 ounces heavy cream
4 ounces of butter, cut into small cubes
Gruyere cheese, grated

  1. Preheat oven to 375.
  2. Peel and thinly slice the potatoes as thin as you can cut them. Use a mandolin if you got one.
  3. Put garlic in saucepan with the milk and bring to a boil. Season with nutmeg, salt, and pepper. and add sliced potatoes.
  4. Return milk to a simmer, and cook potatoes for 10 to 12 minutes, taking care that the milk does not boil over. Discard garlic cloves.
  5. Transfer potatoes and milk to a buttered baking dish, pour cream over the top, and dot with the butter. Sprinke the gruyere cheese on top.
  6. Bake for 45 minutes or until golden brown and the milk has been absorbed.
  7. Allow potatoes to rest for 10 to minutes before slicing and serve up.

Chef says this is a huge portion, so plan accordingly.

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Filed under Comfort food, French food, Potatoes, Side dishes