Tag Archives: ginger

Tsunami’s Sweet Potato & Lemongrass Soup

Because Mother Nature is a temperamental manic depressive, she has decided we need one more grossly cold blast this season before she gives it up to spring like she knows she’s gonna. What a sneaky trick.

Because of this, we at Nummy would like to offer you one last warm soup for cold weather. This is Chef Ben Smith’s recipe from Tsunami, and when Chef Bear Bear made it (sorry buddy – you can’t show me e-mails like that and expect me not to pick up that nickname), everyone was a big fan of the lemongrass bite and the creamy coconut flavor. Put yo’self a pot on today.

4 tbsp unsalted butter
1 yellow onion, sliced
1 tbsp ginger, peeled and minced
5 large sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
4 stalks fresh lemongrass, white part only, minced
2 jalapenos, seeded and  minced
1 13.5 oz of coconut milk
6 cups of water
salt to taste

  1. In a stockpot, melt butter and add onions.  Saute the onions until soft and add ginger, sweet potatoes, lemongrass, and jalapenos.  Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  2. Add coconut milk and water and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until potatoes are soft, about 40 minutes.  Season with salt and puree the soup while still warm.

Barrett likes to top creamy soups like this with toasted walnuts or something similar to give it a crunch, and I second that emotion.

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Filed under Asian food, Comfort food, Restaurant Recipes, Soups

Benihana Salad Dressing

Another much-appreciated recipe from the Hutchison cookbook. I haven’t been able to make this yet due to the seeming impossibility of finding soybean oil, but I’m betting The Pet Store will be just the place to score it. Now if someone could just find me their mustard and ginger sauce recipes, my 12-year-old Benihana dreams would be realized.

1/2 cup diced celery
1/2 cup soybean oil
4 tbsp chopped onion
4 tbsp white vinegar
2 tbsp tomato paste
3 tsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp powdered ginger

  1. Combine all ingredients.
  2. Cover and refrigerate. This recipe is best made 2 days in advance.

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Filed under Appetizers, Asian food, Restaurant Recipes, Salad, Salad dressings, Sauces

Halibut in Green Tea Ginger Broth

Ok RipleyPickles’ posts this week are seriously drool worthy and put mine to shame.   However, I am still on the healthy train, so in case anyone else out there is too here is a new one.   Chef John and I made this last night using a recipe from dear Martha with a few tweaks.  It turned out very good.  Serve with a side of quinoa to really up the health factor. -ts

2 halibut fillets, (6 ounces each)
Coarse salt and ground pepper
1/2 cup quinoa
1 ½  tablespoons peanut oil
1 piece fresh ginger (about 2 inches), peeled and finely chopped
1-2 cloves garlic minced
Dashes of cayenne pepper
2 baby bok choy, cleaned and thinly sliced lengthwise
1/2 cup frozen shelled edamame, thawed
4 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and thinly sliced
1/2 cup snow peas, strings removed
1 cup brewed green tea
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon honey
3 scallions, sliced on the diagonal

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Season halibut with salt and pepper.
  2. In a medium saucepan, bring 1 cup salted water to a boil. Add quinoa, reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook until quinoa is tender and water has been absorbed, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat; set aside.
  3. In a large nonstick skillet, heat oil over medium-high. Cook fillets until golden, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Remove filets from pan (reserve pan with any oil in it). Place fish in an ovenproof dish and bake 8 to 10 minutes or until just cooked through (a paring knife will easily go through fish).
  4. To pan, add ginger, garlic, cayenne,  bok choy, edamame, shiitakes, and snow peas; reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring constantly, for 2- 3 minutes or until the shiitakes begin to soften. Add green tea, soy sauce, and honey. Cook until edamame are tender, about 3 minutes longer. Add scallions to pan. Place some broth and vegetables in each of four shallow bowls. Top with fish fillet .
  5. Season quinoa with salt and serve on the side or in same bowl.

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Filed under Asian food, Fish, Main Course

Hot Ginger Toddy

Apres ski drankin’ continued…you cannot go wrong with a Hot Toddy; they are delicious.  However, I love the idea of incorporating fresh ginger to the mix. -ts

a cup or so of apple cider
1 to 2 ounces of dark liquor (bourbon, whiskey or dark rum)
a drizzle of honey a squeeze of lemon
peeled fresh gingerroot, coarsely chopped- thumb size piece will work  mulling spices (cinnamon sticks, whole cloves, allspice, nutmeg – whatever you have on hand)

  1. Add the ginger and mulling spices to the cider and simmer in a saucepan over medium-low heat for at least 5 minutes (or a full 15 or more if you want full flavor).
  2. Drizzle some honey into a mug and add the liquor, hot cider, and a squeeze of lemon juice. Stir. Optional garnishes: cinnamon stick stirrer, lemon slice

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Filed under Alcohol, Beverages

Fish Vindaloo

The Wikipedias tell me that “vindaloo” is some sort of Indian curry dish. They also tell me that “curry” is a generic term that means a dish that usually includes turmeric, coriander and cumin. And THEN they tell me that “turmeric” is a “rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family.” And to that I say WHAAAAA?

Never has a recipe managed to make me feel so dumb so fast. And so American. To be fair, I did know of curry and turmeric before The Chef gave me this recipe to post, but I couldn’t have told you a darn thing about them, so this has now gone straight to the top of my To Make List in my effort to become a little less Bond-Hopkins-from-middle-school-who-would-only-eat-chicken-fingers. Plain.

Marinade:
3 tablespoons of malt vinegar
1 1/2 teaspoons black peppercorns, crushed
1 1/2 teaspoons of brown sugar
8 each cardamom seeds, green
8 cloves
3 green chilies, seeded
salt to taste
1 1/2 pounds of monkfish ( you can also use shrimp or scallops)

Spice mixture:
4 garlic cloves, chopped
1 tablespoon of ginger, peeled and minced
2 red chilies, seeded
1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
1/2 fenugreek seed (obviously another WHAAA?-inducing herb that you can read about here)
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
2 teaspoons of coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoons turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, ground
1 ounce of malt vinegar

Cooking:
1 1/2 ounces of oil.
3/4 cup of onions, small dice

  1. Combine first 7 ingredients and mix well.  Add fish, and marinate for 1 hour.
  2. Using a spice grinder or mortar and pestle, make a paste with garlic, ginger, spices and vinegar.
  3. Heat oil over medium heat, add onions, and cook until golden brown, 6 to 8 minutes.
  4. Add spice paste and cook over medium low heat, 10 minutes. If it becomes to dry, add a little water.
  5. Remove fish from marinade and add to pan. Cook 5 minutes over medium high heat, stirring constantly. Then add marinade to the pan.
  6. Add 1 cup of water. Bring to a simmer, cover, and lower heat.  Cook for 30 minutes or until tender. Stir to prevent from sticking.
  7. Serve with Basmati Rice and Cilantro Chutney.

 

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Filed under Fish, Indian food, Main Course, Seafood

Chicken Tikka Masala

I know the Chef is the expert in Indian Food, and I cannot wait for him to share more recipes.  However, this recipe is incredible.  I have made it about 3 or 4 times, and every time I am amazed at how tasty it is.  This recipe comes from Grace Parisi, and the spicy tomato creamy sauce is addictive.  The more cayenne pepper the better!  The chicken needs to marinate overnight, so plan accordingly. -ts

MASALA MARINADE
1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
Salt and freshly ground pepper

CHICKEN
2 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken thighs, fat trimmed
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon oil
1 large onion, finely chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 1/2 tablespoons garam masala (any ethinic grocery will have this)
1 1/2 teaspoons pure chile powder
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
One 35-ounce can peeled tomatoes, finely chopped, juices reserved
Pinch of sugar
1 cup heavy cream

  1. MAKE THE MASALA MARINADE: In a large glass or stainless steel bowl, combine the yogurt, garlic, ginger, cumin, coriander, cardamom, cayenne and turmeric. Season with salt and pepper.
  2. PREPARE THE CHICKEN: Using a sharp knife, make a few shallow slashes in each piece of chicken. Add the chicken to the marinade, turn to coat and refrigerate overnight.
  3. Preheat the broiler and position a rack about 8 inches from the heat. Remove the chicken from the marinade; scrape off as much of the marinade as possible. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and spread the pieces on a baking sheet. Broil the chicken, turning once or twice, until just cooked through and browned in spots, about 12 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and cut it into 2-inch pieces.
  4. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, heat  2 tablespoons of oil until shimmering. Add the onion, garlic and ginger and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden, about 8 minutes. Add the garam masala, chile powder and cayenne and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the tomatoes with their juices and the sugar and season with salt and pepper. Cover partially and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is slightly thickened, about 20 minutes. Add the cream and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until thickened, about 10 minutes longer. Stir in the chicken; simmer gently for 10 minutes, stirring frequently, and serve.
  5. Serve With steamed basmati rice, rice pilaf or warm nan.

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Filed under Chicken, Comfort food, Indian food, Main Course

Chinese Dumpling Soup

We made this last night for Paul’s 72nd birfday, and it was 100% delish. I even stepped up my grommet level and poured the excess broth from the bowls back into my tupperware to keep. Nat and Molly then told me they can’t wait to come visit me when I’m old because if I’m doing creepy stuff like that now I’ll probably hit record high levels of insane in my old age. Moral of the story: this broth is the shiz, it’s super easy, and it’s even better the day after, so make some.

8 cups low-sodium chicken or mushroom broth
1 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and julienned or cut into match sticks
1 tablespoon soy sauce, preferably dark
1/4 cup Shaohsing rice cooking wine or pale dry sherry (I used white wine and it was a totally acceptable sub)
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar/or 2 tablespoons black vinegar
2 teaspoons dark sesame oil
1 teaspoon sugar
Pinch of salt
2 carrots, thinly sliced on the bias- about 1 cup
24 frozen Chinese dumplings, pork, shrimp, or 1 pound package
3 scallions (white and green parts), thinly sliced
4 cups bag baby spinach
chopped cilantro (optional)
Asian chili paste (optional)

  1. Put the broth, ginger, soy, wine, vinegar, sesame oil, sugar and salt in a soup pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Adjust the heat so the broth simmers and cooks to lightly flavor with ginger, about 10-15-minutes.
  2. Add the carrots, and simmer until tender and cooked through, about 5 minutes. Just before serving, add the dumplings, cook for 3 minutes, stir in the scallions and spinach and cook until the greens wilt, about 1 minute. Divide among warm bowls and serve. Serve with chili sauce on the side if desired.

This recipe is from The Food Network. We used less spinach than called for and made extra broth because I am a soup-addict, so portion accordingly. We also had to go to the Pet Store (see Freshrita post if you don’t know what I’m talking about) to get dumplings, but it was well worth it. Cabbage, pork & mushroom dumplings are never a bad idea.

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Filed under Appetizers, Asian food, Soups